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Editors' Introduction

Editors' Introduction The application of psychoanalytic concepts and strategies by non‐psychoanalysts for understanding human behaviors and their motivations as portrayed in literature, theater and art abounds over the last 60 or more years. In various fields in the Humanities including History, Philosophy, Sociology and Literature, many scholars approach their domains of interest using the lens of psychoanalytic theory. And as Anna Freud held, psychoanalytic ideas pervade society; most every college graduate and many others know that we have an unconscious mind, that dreams and slips of the tongue have meaning, that we use psychic defense mechanisms of all kinds. Psychoanalytic theory and thought is in the public domain and makes its contribution to people understanding each other and themselves. The converse, the use of literature, theater and art by psychoanalysts to illustrate, to exemplify and detail psychoanalytic concepts goes back to even earlier times, for over one century, as evidenced in Freud's use of Sophocles' Oedipus, the King , and his taking from Plato's Republic , chapter seven, the tripartite model of the city – i.e. of its people – to conceptualize his “structural model” of the mind. In this issue of the Journal we do both. We use literature http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1742-3341
eISSN
1556-9187
DOI
10.1002/aps.285
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The application of psychoanalytic concepts and strategies by non‐psychoanalysts for understanding human behaviors and their motivations as portrayed in literature, theater and art abounds over the last 60 or more years. In various fields in the Humanities including History, Philosophy, Sociology and Literature, many scholars approach their domains of interest using the lens of psychoanalytic theory. And as Anna Freud held, psychoanalytic ideas pervade society; most every college graduate and many others know that we have an unconscious mind, that dreams and slips of the tongue have meaning, that we use psychic defense mechanisms of all kinds. Psychoanalytic theory and thought is in the public domain and makes its contribution to people understanding each other and themselves. The converse, the use of literature, theater and art by psychoanalysts to illustrate, to exemplify and detail psychoanalytic concepts goes back to even earlier times, for over one century, as evidenced in Freud's use of Sophocles' Oedipus, the King , and his taking from Plato's Republic , chapter seven, the tripartite model of the city – i.e. of its people – to conceptualize his “structural model” of the mind. In this issue of the Journal we do both. We use literature

Journal

International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic StudiesWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2011

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