Economic Geography, Forest Distribution, and Woodpecker Diversity in Central Europe

Economic Geography, Forest Distribution, and Woodpecker Diversity in Central Europe To understand the complex mechanisms behind the recent biodiversity decline, it is necessary to complement traditional biological and ecological studies with studies of the economic, historic, and social contexts related to biodiversity loss. We used the completeness of the woodpecker guild as a biodiversity indicator to test the hypothesis that forest biodiversity in Europe is inversely related to the degree of urban‐economic development. We related woodpecker diversity to several socioeconomic indices in 20 central European countries where the basic physiogeographic conditions are similar. As predicted, woodpecker diversity was low in highly developed countries with a long history of intensive land use, whereas in less‐developed, peripheral countries, the woodpecker diversity was much higher and no species had been lost. The negative correlation between the degree of urbanization and woodpecker diversity was interpreted as a causal link between neotechnological landscape degradation and the decline of biodiversity. We discuss, and reject, alternative hypotheses related to the slow postglacial dispersal of species and climatic differences between western and eastern Europe that might explain the observed pattern of woodpecker diversity. The relative importance of particular woodpecker species for the level of woodpecker diversity shows that species depending on naturally dynamic temperate forests are particularly sensitive to anthropogenic changes. Finally, we stress the importance of holistic studies on biodiversity, including ecological, geographical, and social issues, and we encourage specialists and practitioners from different disciplines to examine the European east‐west gradient to learn how to avoid the same biodiversity loss in the East that has afflicted the West. Geografía Económica, Distribución Forestal y Diversidad de Pájaros Carpinteros en Europa Central Para entender los complejos mecanismos detrás del reciente declive de la biodiversidad, es necesario complementar estudios biológicos tradicionales con estudios del contexto económico, histórico y social relacionado con la pérdida de la biodiversidad. Utilizamos el gremio de los pájaros carpinteros como un indicador de la biodiversidad, para evaluar la hipótesis de que la biodiversidad forestal en Europa esta inversamente relacionada con el grado de desarrollo urbano‐económico. Relacionamos la diversidad de los pájaros carpinteros con diversos índices socio‐económicos de países de Europa central donde las condiciones fisiogeográficas básicas son similares. A como se había predecido, la diversidad de pájaros carpinteros fue baja en países altamente desarrollados con una larga historia de uso intensivo del suelo, mientras que en países pariféricos, menos desarrollados, los pájaros carpinteros tuviéron una diversidad mucho mayor y sin pérdida de especies. La correlación negativa entre el grado de urbanización y la diversidad de pájaros carpinteros fue interpretada como un vínculo causal entre la degradación neo‐tecnológica del paisaje y la disminución de la diversidad. Discutimos y rechazamos la hipótesis alternativa relativa a la dispersión postglacial lenta de especies y diferencias climáticas entre Europa Oriental y Occidental la cual podría explicar el patrón observado en la diversidad de pájaros carpinteros. La importancia relativa de especies particulares de pájaros carpinteros para el nivel de diversidad, muestra que las especies dependientes de bosque templados dinámicos son particularmente sensitivas a cambios antropogénicos. Finalmente, resaltamos la importancia de estudios holísticos de biodiversidad incluyendo aspectos ecológicos, geográficos y sociales y motivando a especialistas y practicantes de diversas disciplinas a examiner el gradiente este‐oeste europeo para aprender como evitar en el este las mismas pérdidas en la biodiversidas que han afligido el oeste. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Economic Geography, Forest Distribution, and Woodpecker Diversity in Central Europe

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/economic-geography-forest-distribution-and-woodpecker-diversity-in-xbZcZFIi43
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Society for Conservation Biology
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
DOI
10.1111/j.1523-1739.1998.96310.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To understand the complex mechanisms behind the recent biodiversity decline, it is necessary to complement traditional biological and ecological studies with studies of the economic, historic, and social contexts related to biodiversity loss. We used the completeness of the woodpecker guild as a biodiversity indicator to test the hypothesis that forest biodiversity in Europe is inversely related to the degree of urban‐economic development. We related woodpecker diversity to several socioeconomic indices in 20 central European countries where the basic physiogeographic conditions are similar. As predicted, woodpecker diversity was low in highly developed countries with a long history of intensive land use, whereas in less‐developed, peripheral countries, the woodpecker diversity was much higher and no species had been lost. The negative correlation between the degree of urbanization and woodpecker diversity was interpreted as a causal link between neotechnological landscape degradation and the decline of biodiversity. We discuss, and reject, alternative hypotheses related to the slow postglacial dispersal of species and climatic differences between western and eastern Europe that might explain the observed pattern of woodpecker diversity. The relative importance of particular woodpecker species for the level of woodpecker diversity shows that species depending on naturally dynamic temperate forests are particularly sensitive to anthropogenic changes. Finally, we stress the importance of holistic studies on biodiversity, including ecological, geographical, and social issues, and we encourage specialists and practitioners from different disciplines to examine the European east‐west gradient to learn how to avoid the same biodiversity loss in the East that has afflicted the West. Geografía Económica, Distribución Forestal y Diversidad de Pájaros Carpinteros en Europa Central Para entender los complejos mecanismos detrás del reciente declive de la biodiversidad, es necesario complementar estudios biológicos tradicionales con estudios del contexto económico, histórico y social relacionado con la pérdida de la biodiversidad. Utilizamos el gremio de los pájaros carpinteros como un indicador de la biodiversidad, para evaluar la hipótesis de que la biodiversidad forestal en Europa esta inversamente relacionada con el grado de desarrollo urbano‐económico. Relacionamos la diversidad de los pájaros carpinteros con diversos índices socio‐económicos de países de Europa central donde las condiciones fisiogeográficas básicas son similares. A como se había predecido, la diversidad de pájaros carpinteros fue baja en países altamente desarrollados con una larga historia de uso intensivo del suelo, mientras que en países pariféricos, menos desarrollados, los pájaros carpinteros tuviéron una diversidad mucho mayor y sin pérdida de especies. La correlación negativa entre el grado de urbanización y la diversidad de pájaros carpinteros fue interpretada como un vínculo causal entre la degradación neo‐tecnológica del paisaje y la disminución de la diversidad. Discutimos y rechazamos la hipótesis alternativa relativa a la dispersión postglacial lenta de especies y diferencias climáticas entre Europa Oriental y Occidental la cual podría explicar el patrón observado en la diversidad de pájaros carpinteros. La importancia relativa de especies particulares de pájaros carpinteros para el nivel de diversidad, muestra que las especies dependientes de bosque templados dinámicos son particularmente sensitivas a cambios antropogénicos. Finalmente, resaltamos la importancia de estudios holísticos de biodiversidad incluyendo aspectos ecológicos, geográficos y sociales y motivando a especialistas y practicantes de diversas disciplinas a examiner el gradiente este‐oeste europeo para aprender como evitar en el este las mismas pérdidas en la biodiversidas que han afligido el oeste.

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1998

References

  • Threatened plant, animal and fungus species in Swedish forests: distribution and habitat associations
    Berg, Berg; Ehnström, Ehnström; Gustafsson, Gustafsson; Hallingbäck, Hallingbäck; Jonsell, Jonsell
  • The convergent trajectories of bird communities along ecological successions in European forests
    Blondel, Blondel; Farré, Farré
  • Territorial dynamics in an isolated White‐backed Woodpecker Dendrocopos leucotos population
    Carlson, Carlson; Aulén, Aulén
  • Modeling human factors that affect the loss of biodiversity
    Forester, Forester; Machlis, Machlis
  • The measurement of species diversity
    Peet, Peet

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off