Economic evidence for nonpharmacological asthma management interventions: A systematic review

Economic evidence for nonpharmacological asthma management interventions: A systematic review Asthma management, education and environmental interventions have been reported as cost‐effective in a previous review (Pharm Pract (Granada), 2014;12:493), but methods used to estimate costs and outcomes were not discussed in detail. This review updates the previous review by providing economic evidence on the cost‐effectiveness of studies identified after 2012, and a detailed assessment of the methods used in all identified studies. Twelve databases were searched from 1990 to January 2016, and studies included economic evaluations, asthma subjects and nonpharmacological interventions written in English. Sixty‐four studies were included. Of these, 15 were found in addition to the earlier review; 53% were rated fair in quality and 47% high. Education and self‐management interventions were the most cost‐effective, in line with the earlier review. Self‐reporting was the most common method used to gather resource‐use data, accompanied by bottom‐up approaches to estimate costs. Main outcome measures were asthma‐related hospitalizations (69%), quality of life (41%) and utility (38%), with AQLQ and the EQ‐5D being the most common questionnaires measured prospectively at fixed time points. More rigorous costing methods are needed with a more common quality of life tool to aid greater replicability and comparability amongst asthma studies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Allergy Wiley

Economic evidence for nonpharmacological asthma management interventions: A systematic review

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0105-4538
eISSN
1398-9995
D.O.I.
10.1111/all.13337
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Asthma management, education and environmental interventions have been reported as cost‐effective in a previous review (Pharm Pract (Granada), 2014;12:493), but methods used to estimate costs and outcomes were not discussed in detail. This review updates the previous review by providing economic evidence on the cost‐effectiveness of studies identified after 2012, and a detailed assessment of the methods used in all identified studies. Twelve databases were searched from 1990 to January 2016, and studies included economic evaluations, asthma subjects and nonpharmacological interventions written in English. Sixty‐four studies were included. Of these, 15 were found in addition to the earlier review; 53% were rated fair in quality and 47% high. Education and self‐management interventions were the most cost‐effective, in line with the earlier review. Self‐reporting was the most common method used to gather resource‐use data, accompanied by bottom‐up approaches to estimate costs. Main outcome measures were asthma‐related hospitalizations (69%), quality of life (41%) and utility (38%), with AQLQ and the EQ‐5D being the most common questionnaires measured prospectively at fixed time points. More rigorous costing methods are needed with a more common quality of life tool to aid greater replicability and comparability amongst asthma studies.

Journal

AllergyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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