Eastern Mediterranean gravity potential and the Hellenic subduction process

Eastern Mediterranean gravity potential and the Hellenic subduction process ABSTRACT Tornographic images of the Mediterranean upper mantle P‐wave velocity structure have been used to analyse the gravity potential in the vicinity of the Hellenic subduction zone. The velocity anomalies are assumed to be proportional to density variations according to Birch's law. The effect of the topography on the geoid in the region is also calculated. The results indicate that the upper mantle geoid signal probably has significant amplitudes of several metres, but it correlates poorly with the observed geoid. The geoid calculated from topography correlates well, but has an amplitude that is too large in comparison with the observed geoid. The results show that an improved understanding of the Hellenic subduction zone geoid requires refinement of the Moho topography, so that the effect of this topography can be separated from the upper mantle signature. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Terra Nova Wiley

Eastern Mediterranean gravity potential and the Hellenic subduction process

Terra Nova, Volume 2 (6) – Nov 1, 1990

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0954-4879
eISSN
1365-3121
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-3121.1990.tb00121.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Tornographic images of the Mediterranean upper mantle P‐wave velocity structure have been used to analyse the gravity potential in the vicinity of the Hellenic subduction zone. The velocity anomalies are assumed to be proportional to density variations according to Birch's law. The effect of the topography on the geoid in the region is also calculated. The results indicate that the upper mantle geoid signal probably has significant amplitudes of several metres, but it correlates poorly with the observed geoid. The geoid calculated from topography correlates well, but has an amplitude that is too large in comparison with the observed geoid. The results show that an improved understanding of the Hellenic subduction zone geoid requires refinement of the Moho topography, so that the effect of this topography can be separated from the upper mantle signature.

Journal

Terra NovaWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1990

References

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