Dye‐Coupling in the neostriatum of the rat: I. Modulation by dopamine‐depleting lesions

Dye‐Coupling in the neostriatum of the rat: I. Modulation by dopamine‐depleting lesions Evidence from experiments performed in turtle and fish retina suggests that dopamine (DA) modulates the permeability of gap junctions. The present experiment was aimed at determining if DA has a similar role in the mammalian neostriatum. Adults rats received one of four treatments: Unilateral electrolytic substantia nigra lesions, unilateral injection of 6‐hydroxydopamine (6‐OHDA) into the substantia nigra, unilateral neocortical aspiration, or no treatment. After 3–5 weeks, neostriata from both sides of the brain were prepared for in vitro intracellular recordings. Recorded neurons (N α 150) were filled with Lucifer Yellow (LY), a low molecular weight dye that crosses gap junctions. In animals with electrolytic nigral lesions, dye‐coupling in the ipsilateral neostriatum occurred after 38% of the intracellular injections. After 6‐OHDA lesions, 19% of the injections produced dye‐coupling in the ipsilateral neostriatum. This difference may have been accounted for by the fact that electrolytic lesions produced a greater degree of DA loss than 6‐OHDA injections. Both of these percentages contrast with the very small percentage of dye‐coupling found in intact animals or in animals with neocortical lesions. Dye‐coupling occurred only between medium‐sized spiny cells. No morphological differences between dye‐coupled and non‐dye‐coupled cells were observed with light microscopy. Overall, passive and active electrophysiological properties of dye‐coupled and single neurons were similar. The results suggest that DA may function in the neostriatum to control permeability of gap junctions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Synapse Wiley

Dye‐Coupling in the neostriatum of the rat: I. Modulation by dopamine‐depleting lesions

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/dye-coupling-in-the-neostriatum-of-the-rat-i-modulation-by-dopamine-0FApJJcnpD
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 Alan R. Liss, Inc.
ISSN
0887-4476
eISSN
1098-2396
D.O.I.
10.1002/syn.890040308
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Evidence from experiments performed in turtle and fish retina suggests that dopamine (DA) modulates the permeability of gap junctions. The present experiment was aimed at determining if DA has a similar role in the mammalian neostriatum. Adults rats received one of four treatments: Unilateral electrolytic substantia nigra lesions, unilateral injection of 6‐hydroxydopamine (6‐OHDA) into the substantia nigra, unilateral neocortical aspiration, or no treatment. After 3–5 weeks, neostriata from both sides of the brain were prepared for in vitro intracellular recordings. Recorded neurons (N α 150) were filled with Lucifer Yellow (LY), a low molecular weight dye that crosses gap junctions. In animals with electrolytic nigral lesions, dye‐coupling in the ipsilateral neostriatum occurred after 38% of the intracellular injections. After 6‐OHDA lesions, 19% of the injections produced dye‐coupling in the ipsilateral neostriatum. This difference may have been accounted for by the fact that electrolytic lesions produced a greater degree of DA loss than 6‐OHDA injections. Both of these percentages contrast with the very small percentage of dye‐coupling found in intact animals or in animals with neocortical lesions. Dye‐coupling occurred only between medium‐sized spiny cells. No morphological differences between dye‐coupled and non‐dye‐coupled cells were observed with light microscopy. Overall, passive and active electrophysiological properties of dye‐coupled and single neurons were similar. The results suggest that DA may function in the neostriatum to control permeability of gap junctions.

Journal

SynapseWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1989

References

  • Electrotonic coupling between neurons in the rat mesencephalic nucleus
    Baker, Baker; Llinás, Llinás
  • Dye‐coupling in the neostriatum of the rat: II. Decreased coupling between neurons during development
    Walsh, Walsh; Cepeda, Cepeda; Hull, Hull; Fisher, Fisher; Levine, Levine; Buchwald, Buchwald

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off