Duplication events and the evolution of segmental identity

Duplication events and the evolution of segmental identity Summary Duplication of genes, genomes, or morphological structures (or some combination of these) has long been thought to facilitate evolutionary change. Here we focus on studies of the teleost fishes to consider the conceptual similarities in the evolutionary potential of these three different kinds of duplication events. We review recent data that have confirmed the occurrence of a whole‐genome duplication event in the ray‐finned fish lineage, and discuss whether this event may have fuelled the radiation of teleost fishes. We then consider the fates of individual duplicated genes, from both a theoretical and an experimental viewpoint, focusing on our studies of teleost Hox genes and their functions in patterning the segmented hindbrain. Finally, we consider the duplication of morphological structures, once again drawing on our experimental studies of the hindbrain, which have revealed that experimentally induced duplicated neurons can produce functionally redundant neural circuits. We posit that the availability of duplicated material, independent of its nature, can lead to functional redundancy, which in turn enables evolutionary change. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolution and Development Wiley

Duplication events and the evolution of segmental identity

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1520-541X
eISSN
1525-142X
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1525-142X.2005.05059.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary Duplication of genes, genomes, or morphological structures (or some combination of these) has long been thought to facilitate evolutionary change. Here we focus on studies of the teleost fishes to consider the conceptual similarities in the evolutionary potential of these three different kinds of duplication events. We review recent data that have confirmed the occurrence of a whole‐genome duplication event in the ray‐finned fish lineage, and discuss whether this event may have fuelled the radiation of teleost fishes. We then consider the fates of individual duplicated genes, from both a theoretical and an experimental viewpoint, focusing on our studies of teleost Hox genes and their functions in patterning the segmented hindbrain. Finally, we consider the duplication of morphological structures, once again drawing on our experimental studies of the hindbrain, which have revealed that experimentally induced duplicated neurons can produce functionally redundant neural circuits. We posit that the availability of duplicated material, independent of its nature, can lead to functional redundancy, which in turn enables evolutionary change.

Journal

Evolution and DevelopmentWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2005

References

  • Deconstructing cell determination
    Brunet, Brunet; Ghysen, Ghysen
  • Molecular physiology of osmoregulation in eels and other teleosts
    Cutler, Cutler; Cramb, Cramb
  • The Mauthner cell and other identified neurons of the brainstem escape network of fish
    Eaton, Eaton; Lee, Lee; Foreman, Foreman
  • Preservation of duplicate genes by complementary, degenerative mutations
    Force, Force; Lynch, Lynch; Pickett, Pickett; Amores, Amores; Yan, Yan; Postlethwait, Postlethwait
  • Development of cephalic neural crest cells in embryos of Lampetra japonica , with special reference to the evolution of the jaw
    Horigome, Horigome; Myojin, Myojin; Ueki, Ueki; Hirano, Hirano; Aizawa, Aizawa; Kuratani, Kuratani
  • Basal actinopterygian relationships
    Inoue, Inoue; Miya, Miya; Tsukamoto, Tsukamoto; Nishida, Nishida
  • The probability of duplicate gene preservation by subfunctionalization
    Lynch, Lynch; Force, Force
  • The probability of preservation of a newly arisen gene duplicate
    Lynch, Lynch; O'Hely, O'Hely; Walsh, Walsh; Force, Force
  • Gene and genome duplications in vertebrates
    Meyer, Meyer; Schartl, Schartl
  • The Hox Paradox
    Prince, Prince
  • Duplication and divergence: the evolution of new genes and old ideas
    Taylor, Taylor; Raes, Raes
  • Dealing with saturation at the amino acid level
    Peer, Peer; Frickey, Frickey; Taylor, Taylor; Meyer, Meyer
  • More genes in fish?
    Wittbrodt, Wittbrodt; Meyer, Meyer; Schartl, Schartl

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