Dry thermal resistance of Bacillus anthracis (Sterne) spores and spores of other Bacillus species: implications for biological agent destruction via waste incineration

Dry thermal resistance of Bacillus anthracis (Sterne) spores and spores of other Bacillus... Aims: To obtain needed data on the dry thermal resistance of Bacillus anthracis spores and other Bacillus species for waste incinerator applications. Methods and Results: Tests were conducted in a pilot‐scale incinerator utilizing biological indicators comprised of spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus, Bacillus atrophaeus and B. anthracis (Sterne) and embedded in building material bundles. Tests were also conducted in a dry heat oven to determine the destruction kinetics for the same species. In the pilot‐scale incinerator tests, B. atrophaeus and G. stearothermophilus demonstrated similar thermal sensitivity, but B. anthracis (Sterne) was less thermally resistant than G. stearothermophilus. For the dry heat oven tests conducted at 175°C, the D‐values were 0·4, 0·2 and 0·3 min for B. atrophaeus, B. anthracis (Sterne) and G. stearothermophilus, respectively. Conclusions: Bacillus anthracis (Sterne) possesses similar or less dry heat resistance compared to B. atrophaeus and G. stearothermophilus. Significance and Impact of the Study: Previous studies have demonstrated conditions under which bacterial spores may survive in an incinerator environment. The data from this study may assist in the selection of surrogates or indicator micro‐organisms to ensure B. anthracis spores embedded in building materials are completely inactivated in an incinerator. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Microbiology Wiley

Dry thermal resistance of Bacillus anthracis (Sterne) spores and spores of other Bacillus species: implications for biological agent destruction via waste incineration

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology, Journal of Applied Microbiology. No claim to US Government works
ISSN
1364-5072
eISSN
1365-2672
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-2672.2009.04632.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aims: To obtain needed data on the dry thermal resistance of Bacillus anthracis spores and other Bacillus species for waste incinerator applications. Methods and Results: Tests were conducted in a pilot‐scale incinerator utilizing biological indicators comprised of spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus, Bacillus atrophaeus and B. anthracis (Sterne) and embedded in building material bundles. Tests were also conducted in a dry heat oven to determine the destruction kinetics for the same species. In the pilot‐scale incinerator tests, B. atrophaeus and G. stearothermophilus demonstrated similar thermal sensitivity, but B. anthracis (Sterne) was less thermally resistant than G. stearothermophilus. For the dry heat oven tests conducted at 175°C, the D‐values were 0·4, 0·2 and 0·3 min for B. atrophaeus, B. anthracis (Sterne) and G. stearothermophilus, respectively. Conclusions: Bacillus anthracis (Sterne) possesses similar or less dry heat resistance compared to B. atrophaeus and G. stearothermophilus. Significance and Impact of the Study: Previous studies have demonstrated conditions under which bacterial spores may survive in an incinerator environment. The data from this study may assist in the selection of surrogates or indicator micro‐organisms to ensure B. anthracis spores embedded in building materials are completely inactivated in an incinerator.

Journal

Journal of Applied MicrobiologyWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2010

References

  • Difference between the spores sizes of Bacillus anthracis and other Bacillus species
    Carrera, Carrera; Zandomeni, Zandomeni; Fitzgibbon, Fitzgibbon; Sagripanti, Sagripanti
  • Spores of Bacillus subtilis : their resistance to and killing by radiation, heat, and chemicals
    Setlow, Setlow
  • Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores
    Spotts‐Whitney, Spotts‐Whitney; Beatty, Beatty; Taylor, Taylor; Weyant, Weyant; Sobel, Sobel; Arduino, Arduino; Ashford, Ashford

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