DOJ targets criminal justice MAT constraints

DOJ targets criminal justice MAT constraints The Legal Action Center is touting an initiative by the federal Department of Justice (DOJ) that is seeking to remove discriminatory barriers to medication‐assisted treatment (MAT) with methadone or buprenorphine for opioid use disorders. The DOJ's Civil Rights Division is working with U.S. attorney's offices around the country to educate stakeholders about how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) protects people with substance use disorders, according to a December 2017 announcement by Acting Assistant Attorney General John Gore.The December announcement follows a letter from the U.S. attorney in the Southern District to the New York State Office of the Attorney General explaining that under the ADA, courts may not prohibit the use of MAT. In the letter, clear examples of illegal discrimination are described, such as: “… a court generally could not deny a parent visitation of her child by reason of the parent's … current use of MAT. Nor could a court impose a blanket rule requiring parents to stop participating in MAT in order to gain custody of their children.”“The DOJ has never sent a letter like this before,” said Sally Friedman, legal director with the Legal Action Center. “It was a first‐time‐ever event.”The DOJ letter was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Weekly Wiley

DOJ targets criminal justice MAT constraints

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1042-1394
eISSN
1556-7591
D.O.I.
10.1002/adaw.31894
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Legal Action Center is touting an initiative by the federal Department of Justice (DOJ) that is seeking to remove discriminatory barriers to medication‐assisted treatment (MAT) with methadone or buprenorphine for opioid use disorders. The DOJ's Civil Rights Division is working with U.S. attorney's offices around the country to educate stakeholders about how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) protects people with substance use disorders, according to a December 2017 announcement by Acting Assistant Attorney General John Gore.The December announcement follows a letter from the U.S. attorney in the Southern District to the New York State Office of the Attorney General explaining that under the ADA, courts may not prohibit the use of MAT. In the letter, clear examples of illegal discrimination are described, such as: “… a court generally could not deny a parent visitation of her child by reason of the parent's … current use of MAT. Nor could a court impose a blanket rule requiring parents to stop participating in MAT in order to gain custody of their children.”“The DOJ has never sent a letter like this before,” said Sally Friedman, legal director with the Legal Action Center. “It was a first‐time‐ever event.”The DOJ letter was

Journal

Alcoholism and Drug Abuse WeeklyWiley

Published: Jan 12, 2018

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