Does the Stock Market See a Zero or Small Positive Earnings Surprise as a Red Flag?

Does the Stock Market See a Zero or Small Positive Earnings Surprise as a Red Flag? ABSTRACT This study shows that firms collectively incur a cost for managing earnings and analyst expectations to meet earnings forecasts. We compare the coefficient in the regression of abnormal stock returns on earnings surprise (the earnings response coefficient (ERC)) across ranges of earnings surprises. The ERC for earnings surprises in the range (0, 1¢) is significantly lower than ERCs for earnings surprises in adjacent ranges for firm‐quarters in the early and mid 2000s, but not for those in the 1990s. The results are robust to controlling for the sign of estimated discretionary accruals and the trajectory of analyst earnings forecasts. We further find that investors are right to be skeptical about earnings surprises in the range (0, 1¢). The relation of future earnings surprise with current earnings surprise is more negative for current earnings surprises in that range than for those in any other range. Evidence also suggests analysts react negatively to earnings surprises in that range. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Accounting Research Wiley

Does the Stock Market See a Zero or Small Positive Earnings Surprise as a Red Flag?

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
©, University of Chicago on behalf of the Accounting Research Center, 2009
ISSN
0021-8456
eISSN
1475-679X
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1475-679X.2009.00354.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT This study shows that firms collectively incur a cost for managing earnings and analyst expectations to meet earnings forecasts. We compare the coefficient in the regression of abnormal stock returns on earnings surprise (the earnings response coefficient (ERC)) across ranges of earnings surprises. The ERC for earnings surprises in the range (0, 1¢) is significantly lower than ERCs for earnings surprises in adjacent ranges for firm‐quarters in the early and mid 2000s, but not for those in the 1990s. The results are robust to controlling for the sign of estimated discretionary accruals and the trajectory of analyst earnings forecasts. We further find that investors are right to be skeptical about earnings surprises in the range (0, 1¢). The relation of future earnings surprise with current earnings surprise is more negative for current earnings surprises in that range than for those in any other range. Evidence also suggests analysts react negatively to earnings surprises in that range.

Journal

Journal of Accounting ResearchWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2010

References

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