Does needle biopsy cause an increased risk of extracapsular extension in the diagnosis of metastatic lymph node in melanoma?

Does needle biopsy cause an increased risk of extracapsular extension in the diagnosis of... IntroductionOne of the main routes of metastatic dissemination of melanoma is locoregional, mainly lymphatic. It is common to find a suspicious lymph node during radiological or clinical follow‐up. Histological confirmation of the malignant nature of the lymph node is required before performing a lymphadenectomy, which is associated with significant morbidity, or the implementation of systemic antitumor therapies. This evidence can be given either in the operating room under general or local anesthesia using targeted surgical adenectomy, with or without frozen sections, or through ambulatory external lymph node biopsy (ELB) with a needle or biopsy gun, with or without ultrasound guidance.Regardless of how it is conducted, ELB (fine‐needle aspiration biopsy or needle core biopsy) is a simple, rapid, and validated procedure for histological confirmation of metastatic lymph node localization of melanoma. Thus, to prove metastatic lymph node status, both techniques are validated. However, it seems logical to ask the question regarding the safety of lymph node biopsy, in particular, on the notion of extracapsular extension (ECE) in melanoma.The risk of local complication, and more specifically, seeding along the puncture path after ELB or primary tumor biopsy, has been reported or evoked in several cancers: in sarcoma, mesothelioma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Dermatology Wiley

Does needle biopsy cause an increased risk of extracapsular extension in the diagnosis of metastatic lymph node in melanoma?

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
International Journal of Dermatology © 2018 International Society of Dermatology
ISSN
0011-9059
eISSN
1365-4632
D.O.I.
10.1111/ijd.13936
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionOne of the main routes of metastatic dissemination of melanoma is locoregional, mainly lymphatic. It is common to find a suspicious lymph node during radiological or clinical follow‐up. Histological confirmation of the malignant nature of the lymph node is required before performing a lymphadenectomy, which is associated with significant morbidity, or the implementation of systemic antitumor therapies. This evidence can be given either in the operating room under general or local anesthesia using targeted surgical adenectomy, with or without frozen sections, or through ambulatory external lymph node biopsy (ELB) with a needle or biopsy gun, with or without ultrasound guidance.Regardless of how it is conducted, ELB (fine‐needle aspiration biopsy or needle core biopsy) is a simple, rapid, and validated procedure for histological confirmation of metastatic lymph node localization of melanoma. Thus, to prove metastatic lymph node status, both techniques are validated. However, it seems logical to ask the question regarding the safety of lymph node biopsy, in particular, on the notion of extracapsular extension (ECE) in melanoma.The risk of local complication, and more specifically, seeding along the puncture path after ELB or primary tumor biopsy, has been reported or evoked in several cancers: in sarcoma, mesothelioma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and

Journal

International Journal of DermatologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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