Does conditioned pain modulation predict the magnitude of placebo effects in patients with neuropathic pain?

Does conditioned pain modulation predict the magnitude of placebo effects in patients with... IntroductionConditioned pain modulation (CPM) is a validated measure of the function of endogenous pain inhibitory pathways (Kennedy et al., ) and has a well‐documented analgesic effect in both animals (Le Bars et al., ,b) and humans (Willer et al., ; De Broucker et al., ). CPM is assessed via ‘pain inhibits pain’ paradigms that test whether central inhibition of a painful stimulus can be induced by applying a second painful stimulus to a remote body region (i.e. counter‐irritation) (Le Bars et al., ; Pud et al., ; Lewis et al., ). With a normally functioning endogenous pain modulatory system, the intensity of the primary test stimulus is reduced after the conditioning pain stimulus (Le Bars et al., ; Willer et al., ). CPM reflects bottom‐up activation of endogenous pain modulatory mechanisms (Pud et al., ) and has been related to neurotransmitter systems such as the endogenous opioid system (Willer et al., ; King et al., ). Yet, studies have shown that the pain relief related to CPM paradigms may also be influenced by cognitive factors such as expectations (Lariviere et al., ; Bjorkedal and Flaten, ; Nir et al., ; Cormier et al., ; France et al., ), which suggest that CPM is not exclusively an expression of bottom‐up activation of endogenous pain modulation.Placebo effects http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Pain Wiley

Does conditioned pain modulation predict the magnitude of placebo effects in patients with neuropathic pain?

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 European Pain Federation ‐ EFIC®
ISSN
1090-3801
eISSN
1532-2149
D.O.I.
10.1002/ejp.1164
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionConditioned pain modulation (CPM) is a validated measure of the function of endogenous pain inhibitory pathways (Kennedy et al., ) and has a well‐documented analgesic effect in both animals (Le Bars et al., ,b) and humans (Willer et al., ; De Broucker et al., ). CPM is assessed via ‘pain inhibits pain’ paradigms that test whether central inhibition of a painful stimulus can be induced by applying a second painful stimulus to a remote body region (i.e. counter‐irritation) (Le Bars et al., ; Pud et al., ; Lewis et al., ). With a normally functioning endogenous pain modulatory system, the intensity of the primary test stimulus is reduced after the conditioning pain stimulus (Le Bars et al., ; Willer et al., ). CPM reflects bottom‐up activation of endogenous pain modulatory mechanisms (Pud et al., ) and has been related to neurotransmitter systems such as the endogenous opioid system (Willer et al., ; King et al., ). Yet, studies have shown that the pain relief related to CPM paradigms may also be influenced by cognitive factors such as expectations (Lariviere et al., ; Bjorkedal and Flaten, ; Nir et al., ; Cormier et al., ; France et al., ), which suggest that CPM is not exclusively an expression of bottom‐up activation of endogenous pain modulation.Placebo effects

Journal

European Journal of PainWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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