DO GEOLOGICAL OR CLIMATIC PROCESSES DRIVE SPECIATION IN DYNAMIC ARCHIPELAGOS? THE TEMPO AND MODE OF DIVERSIFICATION IN SOUTHEAST ASIAN SHREWS

DO GEOLOGICAL OR CLIMATIC PROCESSES DRIVE SPECIATION IN DYNAMIC ARCHIPELAGOS? THE TEMPO AND MODE... Geological and climatic processes potentially alter speciation rates by generating and modifying barriers to dispersal. In Southeast Asia, two processes have substantially altered the distribution of land. Volcanic uplift produced many new islands during the Miocene–Pliocene and repeated sea level fluctuations during the Pleistocene resulted in intermittent land connections among islands. Each process represents a potential driver of diversification. We use a phylogenetic analysis of a group of Southeast Asian shrews (Crocidura) to examine geographic and temporal processes of diversification. In general, diversification has taken place in allopatry following the colonization of new areas. Sulawesi provides an exception, where we cannot reject within‐island speciation for a clade of eight sympatric and syntopic species. We find only weak support for temporally declining diversification rates, implying that neither volcanic uplift nor sea level fluctuations had a strong effect on diversification rates. We suggest that dynamic archipelagos continually offer new opportunities for allopatric diversification, thereby sustaining high speciation rates over long periods of time, or Southeast Asian shrews represent an immature radiation on a density‐dependent trajectory that has yet to fill geographic and ecological space. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolution Wiley

DO GEOLOGICAL OR CLIMATIC PROCESSES DRIVE SPECIATION IN DYNAMIC ARCHIPELAGOS? THE TEMPO AND MODE OF DIVERSIFICATION IN SOUTHEAST ASIAN SHREWS

Evolution, Volume 63 (10) – Oct 1, 2009

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2009 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2009 The Society for the Study of Evolution
ISSN
0014-3820
eISSN
1558-5646
DOI
10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00743.x
pmid
19500148
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Geological and climatic processes potentially alter speciation rates by generating and modifying barriers to dispersal. In Southeast Asia, two processes have substantially altered the distribution of land. Volcanic uplift produced many new islands during the Miocene–Pliocene and repeated sea level fluctuations during the Pleistocene resulted in intermittent land connections among islands. Each process represents a potential driver of diversification. We use a phylogenetic analysis of a group of Southeast Asian shrews (Crocidura) to examine geographic and temporal processes of diversification. In general, diversification has taken place in allopatry following the colonization of new areas. Sulawesi provides an exception, where we cannot reject within‐island speciation for a clade of eight sympatric and syntopic species. We find only weak support for temporally declining diversification rates, implying that neither volcanic uplift nor sea level fluctuations had a strong effect on diversification rates. We suggest that dynamic archipelagos continually offer new opportunities for allopatric diversification, thereby sustaining high speciation rates over long periods of time, or Southeast Asian shrews represent an immature radiation on a density‐dependent trajectory that has yet to fill geographic and ecological space.

Journal

EvolutionWiley

Published: Oct 1, 2009

References

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