Divide Angles and Their Relation to Interior Link Lengths in Natural Channel Networks

Divide Angles and Their Relation to Interior Link Lengths in Natural Channel Networks Although significant progress in understanding the geomorphic controls of fluvially eroded landscapes has recently been made through the study of the topologic and orientation properties of natural channel networks (e.g., [2,13,6,9], the metric properties of such networks and their drainage basins also merit intensive study “because it seems intuitively more plausible that the geomorphic comp. ponents of stream networks are to be identifiied at this level” [17, 1941. The dimensionless metric properties proposed by Smart [I41have considerable appeal in this respect. However, most studies in the recent past have been concerned with channel link lengths, and this trend seems likely to continue in the future, for channel links are the fundamental elements of channel networks, and hence, their lengths are a morphometric property of basic importance. Channel links are designated either as exterior or interior links according to whether they emanate, respectively, from a source or a fork at their upstream end [12]. Mock [lo]has classified interior links, which are the subject ofthis study, into four types termed CT (cis-trans), B (bifurcating), T (tributary), and TB (tributarybifurcating) links. Mocks classification is based on essentially two criteria: (1) whether or not the magnitudes of the two links that join http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geographical Analysis Wiley

Divide Angles and Their Relation to Interior Link Lengths in Natural Channel Networks

Geographical Analysis, Volume 12 (2) – Apr 1, 1980

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1980 The Ohio State University
ISSN
0016-7363
eISSN
1538-4632
DOI
10.1111/j.1538-4632.1980.tb00025.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although significant progress in understanding the geomorphic controls of fluvially eroded landscapes has recently been made through the study of the topologic and orientation properties of natural channel networks (e.g., [2,13,6,9], the metric properties of such networks and their drainage basins also merit intensive study “because it seems intuitively more plausible that the geomorphic comp. ponents of stream networks are to be identifiied at this level” [17, 1941. The dimensionless metric properties proposed by Smart [I41have considerable appeal in this respect. However, most studies in the recent past have been concerned with channel link lengths, and this trend seems likely to continue in the future, for channel links are the fundamental elements of channel networks, and hence, their lengths are a morphometric property of basic importance. Channel links are designated either as exterior or interior links according to whether they emanate, respectively, from a source or a fork at their upstream end [12]. Mock [lo]has classified interior links, which are the subject ofthis study, into four types termed CT (cis-trans), B (bifurcating), T (tributary), and TB (tributarybifurcating) links. Mocks classification is based on essentially two criteria: (1) whether or not the magnitudes of the two links that join

Journal

Geographical AnalysisWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1980

References

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