Diversity and specificity of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae on wild and cultivated legumes

Diversity and specificity of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae on wild and cultivated legumes The symbiotic partnerships between legumes and their root‐nodule bacteria (rhizobia) vary widely in their degree of specificity, but the underlying reasons are not understood. To assess the potential for host‐range evolution, we have investigated microheterogeneity among the shared symbionts of a group of related legume species. Host specificity and genetic diversity were characterized for a soil population of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae (Rlv) sampled using six wild Vicia and Lathyrus species and the crop plants pea (Pisum sativum) and broad bean (Vicia faba). Genetic variation among 625 isolates was assessed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of loci on the chromosome (ribosomal gene spacer) and symbiosis plasmid (nodD region). Broad bean strongly favoured a particular symbiotic genotype that formed a distinct phylogenetic subgroup of Rlv nodulation genotypes but was associated with a range of chromosomal backgrounds. Host range tests of 80 isolates demonstrated that only 34% of isolates were able to nodulate V. faba. By contrast, 89% were able to nodulate all the local wild hosts tested, so high genetic diversity of the rhizobial population cannot be ascribed directly to the diversity of host species at the site. Overall the picture is of a population of symbionts that is diversified by plasmid transfer and shared fairly indiscriminately by local wild legume hosts. The crop species are less promiscuous in their interaction with symbionts than the wild legumes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Ecology Wiley

Diversity and specificity of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae on wild and cultivated legumes

Molecular Ecology, Volume 13 (8) – Jan 1, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/diversity-and-specificity-of-rhizobium-leguminosarum-biovar-viciae-on-Z8RO01jp2Z
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0962-1083
eISSN
1365-294X
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-294X.2004.02259.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The symbiotic partnerships between legumes and their root‐nodule bacteria (rhizobia) vary widely in their degree of specificity, but the underlying reasons are not understood. To assess the potential for host‐range evolution, we have investigated microheterogeneity among the shared symbionts of a group of related legume species. Host specificity and genetic diversity were characterized for a soil population of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae (Rlv) sampled using six wild Vicia and Lathyrus species and the crop plants pea (Pisum sativum) and broad bean (Vicia faba). Genetic variation among 625 isolates was assessed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of loci on the chromosome (ribosomal gene spacer) and symbiosis plasmid (nodD region). Broad bean strongly favoured a particular symbiotic genotype that formed a distinct phylogenetic subgroup of Rlv nodulation genotypes but was associated with a range of chromosomal backgrounds. Host range tests of 80 isolates demonstrated that only 34% of isolates were able to nodulate V. faba. By contrast, 89% were able to nodulate all the local wild hosts tested, so high genetic diversity of the rhizobial population cannot be ascribed directly to the diversity of host species at the site. Overall the picture is of a population of symbionts that is diversified by plasmid transfer and shared fairly indiscriminately by local wild legume hosts. The crop species are less promiscuous in their interaction with symbionts than the wild legumes.

Journal

Molecular EcologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2004

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off