Divergence in pollen performance between Clarkia sister species with contrasting mating systems supports predictions of sexual selection

Divergence in pollen performance between Clarkia sister species with contrasting mating systems... Animal taxa that differ in the intensity of sperm competition often differ in sperm production or swimming speed, arguably due to sexual selection on postcopulatory male traits affecting siring success. In plants, closely related self‐ and cross‐pollinated taxa similarly differ in the opportunity for sexual selection among male gametophytes after pollination, so traits such as the proportion of pollen on the stigma that rapidly enters the style and mean pollen tube growth rate (PTGR) are predicted to diverge between them. To date, no studies have tested this prediction in multiple plant populations under uniform conditions. We tested for differences in pollen performance in greenhouse‐raised populations of two Clarkia sister species: the predominantly outcrossing C. unguiculata and the facultatively self‐pollinating C. exilis. Within populations of each taxon, groups of individuals were reciprocally pollinated (n = 1153 pollinations) and their styles examined four hours later. We tested for the effects of species, population, pollen type (self vs. outcross), the number of competing pollen grains, and temperature on pollen performance. Clarkia unguiculata exhibited higher mean PTGR than C. exilis; pollen type had no effect on performance in either taxon. The difference between these species in PTGR is consistent with predictions of sexual selection theory. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolution Wiley

Divergence in pollen performance between Clarkia sister species with contrasting mating systems supports predictions of sexual selection

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/divergence-in-pollen-performance-between-clarkia-sister-species-with-Qww3mCxwfn
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018, Society for the Study of Evolution
ISSN
0014-3820
eISSN
1558-5646
D.O.I.
10.1111/evo.13429
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Animal taxa that differ in the intensity of sperm competition often differ in sperm production or swimming speed, arguably due to sexual selection on postcopulatory male traits affecting siring success. In plants, closely related self‐ and cross‐pollinated taxa similarly differ in the opportunity for sexual selection among male gametophytes after pollination, so traits such as the proportion of pollen on the stigma that rapidly enters the style and mean pollen tube growth rate (PTGR) are predicted to diverge between them. To date, no studies have tested this prediction in multiple plant populations under uniform conditions. We tested for differences in pollen performance in greenhouse‐raised populations of two Clarkia sister species: the predominantly outcrossing C. unguiculata and the facultatively self‐pollinating C. exilis. Within populations of each taxon, groups of individuals were reciprocally pollinated (n = 1153 pollinations) and their styles examined four hours later. We tested for the effects of species, population, pollen type (self vs. outcross), the number of competing pollen grains, and temperature on pollen performance. Clarkia unguiculata exhibited higher mean PTGR than C. exilis; pollen type had no effect on performance in either taxon. The difference between these species in PTGR is consistent with predictions of sexual selection theory.

Journal

EvolutionWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off