Disturbance regimes and vegetation dynamics: role of floods in riverine wetlands

Disturbance regimes and vegetation dynamics: role of floods in riverine wetlands Abstract. This study tested whether the frequency of flood disturbances was able to slow down or stabilize vegetation succession in former braided channels over a decade. According to the Patch Dynamics Concept and to succession theory, species richness and diversity should be high but stable in the frequently (40 days/year) flooded channel, and should change over time in the infrequently (1 day/year) flooded one. Within the frequently disturbed channel, composition of vegetation as well as species richness and diversity appeared stable through dynamic equilibrium over the decade. Only one zone, because of particular geomorphological features that decreased disturbance intensity, developed highest diversity and richness as expected from the Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis. The highest disturbance effect decreased species richness and was related to a higher spatial heterogeneity of the substrate (number of grain‐size classes). In the other zones, richness and diversity appeared to be lowest where disturbance frequency was lowest or disturbance intensity was highest. From 1981 to 1987, the infrequently flooded channel underwent succession, and species richness increased in the major part of the channel, whereas diversity increased only in its extreme parts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Vegetation Science Wiley

Disturbance regimes and vegetation dynamics: role of floods in riverine wetlands

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1996 IAVS ‐ the International Association of Vegetation Science
ISSN
1100-9233
eISSN
1654-1103
DOI
10.2307/3236373
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. This study tested whether the frequency of flood disturbances was able to slow down or stabilize vegetation succession in former braided channels over a decade. According to the Patch Dynamics Concept and to succession theory, species richness and diversity should be high but stable in the frequently (40 days/year) flooded channel, and should change over time in the infrequently (1 day/year) flooded one. Within the frequently disturbed channel, composition of vegetation as well as species richness and diversity appeared stable through dynamic equilibrium over the decade. Only one zone, because of particular geomorphological features that decreased disturbance intensity, developed highest diversity and richness as expected from the Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis. The highest disturbance effect decreased species richness and was related to a higher spatial heterogeneity of the substrate (number of grain‐size classes). In the other zones, richness and diversity appeared to be lowest where disturbance frequency was lowest or disturbance intensity was highest. From 1981 to 1987, the infrequently flooded channel underwent succession, and species richness increased in the major part of the channel, whereas diversity increased only in its extreme parts.

Journal

Journal of Vegetation ScienceWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1996

References

  • Effects of grazing, competition, disturbance and fire on species composition and diversity in grassland communities
    Belsky, Belsky
  • Aquatic vegetation and hydrology of a braided river floodplain
    Bornette, Bornette; Amoros, Amoros
  • Effect of allogenic processes on successional rates in former river channels
    Bornette, Bornette; Amoros, Amoros; Chessel, Chessel
  • Early primary succession on Mount St. Helens, Washington, USA
    Moral, Moral; Titus, Titus; Cook, Cook
  • Patterns of plant diversity during succession under different disturbance regimes
    Denslow, Denslow
  • Plant succession in areas of scorched and blown‐down forest after the 1980 eruption of Mount St Helens, Washington
    Halpern, Halpern; Frenzen, Frenzen; Means, Means; Franklin, Franklin
  • The role of disturbance in natural communities
    Sousa, Sousa

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