Dissociation between executed and imagined bimanual movements in autism spectrum conditions

Dissociation between executed and imagined bimanual movements in autism spectrum conditions IntroductionMotor disturbances are of substantial clinical and functional importance in autism spectrum conditions (ASC), and although are not considered to be core features of autism they have a relevant impact on persons' quality of life and social development. Indeed, together with social and language deficits, motor deficits can be considered among the first visible behavioral problems and become apparent across childhood and adolescence [for a review see Gowen & Hamilton, ]. Children with ASC generally present clumsiness, postural instability, motor coordination and poor performance on several motor skills tests [Fournier, Hass, Naik, Lodha, & Cauraugh, ; Whyatt & Craig, ], among which production of both communicative and meaningless gestures [Dziuk et al., ; Stieglitz Ham et al., ; Mostofsky et al., ].In recent years, these heterogeneous motor difficulties in ASC have been linked to an alteration of motor simulation processes [Gallese, Rochat, & Berchio, ; Eigsti, ; Oberman & Ramachandran, ]. Motor simulation implies that sensorimotor information related to movement execution is also recruited by other motor‐related skills such as imitation, action understanding or imaging one's own movements [Decety, ; Decety & Grèzes, ].Motor simulation has been classically and extensively investigated in ASC by means of imitation tasks [for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Autism Research Wiley

Dissociation between executed and imagined bimanual movements in autism spectrum conditions

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1939-3792
eISSN
1939-3806
D.O.I.
10.1002/aur.1902
Publisher site
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Abstract

IntroductionMotor disturbances are of substantial clinical and functional importance in autism spectrum conditions (ASC), and although are not considered to be core features of autism they have a relevant impact on persons' quality of life and social development. Indeed, together with social and language deficits, motor deficits can be considered among the first visible behavioral problems and become apparent across childhood and adolescence [for a review see Gowen & Hamilton, ]. Children with ASC generally present clumsiness, postural instability, motor coordination and poor performance on several motor skills tests [Fournier, Hass, Naik, Lodha, & Cauraugh, ; Whyatt & Craig, ], among which production of both communicative and meaningless gestures [Dziuk et al., ; Stieglitz Ham et al., ; Mostofsky et al., ].In recent years, these heterogeneous motor difficulties in ASC have been linked to an alteration of motor simulation processes [Gallese, Rochat, & Berchio, ; Eigsti, ; Oberman & Ramachandran, ]. Motor simulation implies that sensorimotor information related to movement execution is also recruited by other motor‐related skills such as imitation, action understanding or imaging one's own movements [Decety, ; Decety & Grèzes, ].Motor simulation has been classically and extensively investigated in ASC by means of imitation tasks [for

Journal

Autism ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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