Displacing place‐identity: A discursive approach to locating self and other

Displacing place‐identity: A discursive approach to locating self and other Questions of ‘who we are’ are often intimately related to questions of ‘where we are’, an idea captured in the environmental psychological concept of place‐identity. The value of this concept is that it attends to the located nature of subjectivity, challenging the disembodied notions of identity preferred by social psychologists. The topic of place‐identity would thus seem to be a productive point around which the sub‐disciplines of social and environmental psychology might meet, answering calls for greater disciplinary cross‐fertilization. This study contributes to this project by presenting a sympathetic but critical evaluation of research on place‐identity. It argues that such research is valuable in that it has established the importance of place for creating and sustaining a sense of self. However, drawing on recent developments in discursive approaches to social psychology, the authors identify several limitations with existing work on place‐identity. This critique is then developed through analysis of an ongoing research programme located in the changing landscapes of the new South Africa. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Social Psychology Wiley

Displacing place‐identity: A discursive approach to locating self and other

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/displacing-place-identity-a-discursive-approach-to-locating-self-and-l3qy0g0zxS
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2000 The British Psychological Society
ISSN
0144-6665
eISSN
2044-8309
D.O.I.
10.1348/014466600164318
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Questions of ‘who we are’ are often intimately related to questions of ‘where we are’, an idea captured in the environmental psychological concept of place‐identity. The value of this concept is that it attends to the located nature of subjectivity, challenging the disembodied notions of identity preferred by social psychologists. The topic of place‐identity would thus seem to be a productive point around which the sub‐disciplines of social and environmental psychology might meet, answering calls for greater disciplinary cross‐fertilization. This study contributes to this project by presenting a sympathetic but critical evaluation of research on place‐identity. It argues that such research is valuable in that it has established the importance of place for creating and sustaining a sense of self. However, drawing on recent developments in discursive approaches to social psychology, the authors identify several limitations with existing work on place‐identity. This critique is then developed through analysis of an ongoing research programme located in the changing landscapes of the new South Africa.

Journal

British Journal of Social PsychologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off