Dispersal and Use of Corridors by Birds in Wooded Patches on an Agricultural Landscape

Dispersal and Use of Corridors by Birds in Wooded Patches on an Agricultural Landscape Dispersal behavior has important effects on the persistence and recolonization of populations, but is one of the least understood traits of most organisms. Knowledge of patterns of fledgling, natal, and breeding dispersal of birds in a patchy environment will assist in decisions regarding reserve design and protection or construction of corridors. I present data on movement patterns of three migratory bird species, American Robin (Turdus migratorius), Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum), and Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus). These birds are relatively common breeders in south‐central North Dakota (U.S.) in riparian woodlands and in shelterbelts (woodlots planted as windbreaks in the open agricultural environment). Field assistants and I individually marked and monitored the movements of more than 500 adults breeding in a network of shelterbelts across an 8 × 11 km study area. Most movement occurred at relatively short distances within a shelterbelt. Movements by adults between shelterbelt sites, although rare, occurred significantly more frequently between sites connected by a wooded corridor than between unconnected sites. For robins, there were on average 2.5 dispersal events between each pair of connected sites, but only 0.17 dispersal events between each pair of unconnected sites (Mann‐Whitney test, significant at p < 0.009). Because unconnected and connected sites were similar in average area (1.7 to 1.9 ha), distance to next wooded habitat, and tree‐species composition, this result provides a test of the hypothesis that organisms disperse preferentially along connecting corridors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Dispersal and Use of Corridors by Birds in Wooded Patches on an Agricultural Landscape

Conservation Biology, Volume 9 (4) – Aug 1, 1995

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/dispersal-and-use-of-corridors-by-birds-in-wooded-patches-on-an-iiocq4F0RN
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1523-1739.1995.09040845.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dispersal behavior has important effects on the persistence and recolonization of populations, but is one of the least understood traits of most organisms. Knowledge of patterns of fledgling, natal, and breeding dispersal of birds in a patchy environment will assist in decisions regarding reserve design and protection or construction of corridors. I present data on movement patterns of three migratory bird species, American Robin (Turdus migratorius), Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum), and Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus). These birds are relatively common breeders in south‐central North Dakota (U.S.) in riparian woodlands and in shelterbelts (woodlots planted as windbreaks in the open agricultural environment). Field assistants and I individually marked and monitored the movements of more than 500 adults breeding in a network of shelterbelts across an 8 × 11 km study area. Most movement occurred at relatively short distances within a shelterbelt. Movements by adults between shelterbelt sites, although rare, occurred significantly more frequently between sites connected by a wooded corridor than between unconnected sites. For robins, there were on average 2.5 dispersal events between each pair of connected sites, but only 0.17 dispersal events between each pair of unconnected sites (Mann‐Whitney test, significant at p < 0.009). Because unconnected and connected sites were similar in average area (1.7 to 1.9 ha), distance to next wooded habitat, and tree‐species composition, this result provides a test of the hypothesis that organisms disperse preferentially along connecting corridors.

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Aug 1, 1995

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off