Digital microscopy as a screening tool for the diagnosis of hereditary hemolytic anemia

Digital microscopy as a screening tool for the diagnosis of hereditary hemolytic anemia INTRODUCTIONThe differential diagnosis of hereditary hemolytic anemia is often complicated and time‐consuming. It requires advanced laboratory tests, such as hemoglobin characterization by high‐performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), osmotic fragility tests, osmotic gradient ektacytometry, EMA‐binding test, and activity measurements of multiple red cell enzymes. In addition, genetic tests are regularly needed to confirm a suspected disorder, which increases financial burdens for hospital budgets and healthcare insurance companies. One of the first steps in the differential diagnosis of hemolytic anemia is a careful microscopic examination of the morphological appearance of the red blood cell (RBC). Manual morphology analysis, however, is time‐consuming, expensive and always subjected to some level of subjectivity. Manual morphology is also hampered by a lack of standardization, although attempts to standardize the nomenclature and grading system of peripheral blood smears is an important step forward. A relatively inexpensive and high‐throughput gatekeeper that gives direction for further diagnostic testing would therefore strongly increase the diagnostic efficiency in the field of hereditary hemolytic anemia.Digital microscopy (DM) is a relatively new technique that automatically classifies the cells using the accompanying software. DM has first been validated for leukocyte differentiation, and good correlations between automated and manual examinations of peripheral blood smears were http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Laboratory Hematology Wiley

Digital microscopy as a screening tool for the diagnosis of hereditary hemolytic anemia

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
1751-5521
eISSN
1751-553X
D.O.I.
10.1111/ijlh.12758
Publisher site
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Abstract

INTRODUCTIONThe differential diagnosis of hereditary hemolytic anemia is often complicated and time‐consuming. It requires advanced laboratory tests, such as hemoglobin characterization by high‐performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), osmotic fragility tests, osmotic gradient ektacytometry, EMA‐binding test, and activity measurements of multiple red cell enzymes. In addition, genetic tests are regularly needed to confirm a suspected disorder, which increases financial burdens for hospital budgets and healthcare insurance companies. One of the first steps in the differential diagnosis of hemolytic anemia is a careful microscopic examination of the morphological appearance of the red blood cell (RBC). Manual morphology analysis, however, is time‐consuming, expensive and always subjected to some level of subjectivity. Manual morphology is also hampered by a lack of standardization, although attempts to standardize the nomenclature and grading system of peripheral blood smears is an important step forward. A relatively inexpensive and high‐throughput gatekeeper that gives direction for further diagnostic testing would therefore strongly increase the diagnostic efficiency in the field of hereditary hemolytic anemia.Digital microscopy (DM) is a relatively new technique that automatically classifies the cells using the accompanying software. DM has first been validated for leukocyte differentiation, and good correlations between automated and manual examinations of peripheral blood smears were

Journal

International Journal of Laboratory HematologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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