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Digital blood flow, arteriovenous anastomoses and laminitis

Digital blood flow, arteriovenous anastomoses and laminitis Digital blood flow, arteriovenous anastomoses and laminitis THE CIRCULATION OF the horse's hoof lies within the small space between the horny keratin and the pedal bone and has two major functions. It provides nutrient blood flow, particularly to regions of epidermal proliferation, and it is involved in thermoregulation. In the dermal laminae, axial and interconnecting arteries give rise to capillary tufts with unique focal diverticula and enlargements, the function of which is unknown (Mishra and Leach 1983a; Pollitt and Molyneux 1990). Laminar capillaries drain into anastomosing laminar veins, which form the bulk of the vascular skeleton and drain into axial veins. In the dermal papillae of the sole, frog, coronary region, and periople a central artery and vein are enmeshed in a sheath of capillaries (Pollitt and Molyneux 1990). Nutrition of the dermal laminae and papillae requires that capillary blood flow be matched to metabolic demands. Capillary blood flow is therefore regulated as in all systemic tissues by the muscular arterioles. The response of these resistance vessels to vasoactive agents is similar to other skin vascular beds (Robinson et a1 1975). The hoof has a complex venous drainage system. Extensive plexuses of large veins exist adjacent to the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Equine Veterinary Journal Wiley

Digital blood flow, arteriovenous anastomoses and laminitis

Equine Veterinary Journal , Volume 22 (6) – Nov 1, 1990

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 1990 EVJ Ltd
ISSN
0425-1644
eISSN
2042-3306
DOI
10.1111/j.2042-3306.1990.tb04298.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Digital blood flow, arteriovenous anastomoses and laminitis THE CIRCULATION OF the horse's hoof lies within the small space between the horny keratin and the pedal bone and has two major functions. It provides nutrient blood flow, particularly to regions of epidermal proliferation, and it is involved in thermoregulation. In the dermal laminae, axial and interconnecting arteries give rise to capillary tufts with unique focal diverticula and enlargements, the function of which is unknown (Mishra and Leach 1983a; Pollitt and Molyneux 1990). Laminar capillaries drain into anastomosing laminar veins, which form the bulk of the vascular skeleton and drain into axial veins. In the dermal papillae of the sole, frog, coronary region, and periople a central artery and vein are enmeshed in a sheath of capillaries (Pollitt and Molyneux 1990). Nutrition of the dermal laminae and papillae requires that capillary blood flow be matched to metabolic demands. Capillary blood flow is therefore regulated as in all systemic tissues by the muscular arterioles. The response of these resistance vessels to vasoactive agents is similar to other skin vascular beds (Robinson et a1 1975). The hoof has a complex venous drainage system. Extensive plexuses of large veins exist adjacent to the

Journal

Equine Veterinary JournalWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1990

References

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