Digest: The Red Queen hypothesis demonstrated by the Daphnia‐Caullerya host‐parasite system†

Digest: The Red Queen hypothesis demonstrated by the Daphnia‐Caullerya host‐parasite system† “Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place.” This is what the Red Queen told Alice in “Through the looking‐glass and what Alice found there” (Carroll ). More than a century later, Van Valen took advantage of that dialogue to spawn the Red Queen hypothesis, which has become the main model to explain host‐parasite evolutionary dynamics. In brief, Van Valen's Red Queen hypothesis states that species must be in constant change to continue in the same place (Van Valen ). In that sense, antagonistic interactions between species lead to coevolution. Though reciprocal adaptation has been widely studied in host‐parasite systems, few studies have observed the predicted turnover of genotypes within a natural population in real time.In this issue, Turko et al. () provide evidence for the Red Queen hypothesis at the population level in the asexually (sporadically sexual) reproducing freshwater zooplankton Daphnia (Cladocera, Crustacea) and its seasonal endoparasite Caullerya. Using a long‐term monitoring experiment, Turko and colleagues tested whether epidemic parasitism affected the clonal turnover of Daphnia. They employed allozymes and microsatellite markers to genotype Daphnia through time, and were thus able to detect changes in genotype frequencies (i.e., clonal http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolution Wiley

Digest: The Red Queen hypothesis demonstrated by the Daphnia‐Caullerya host‐parasite system†

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018, Society for the Study of Evolution
ISSN
0014-3820
eISSN
1558-5646
D.O.I.
10.1111/evo.13439
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

“Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place.” This is what the Red Queen told Alice in “Through the looking‐glass and what Alice found there” (Carroll ). More than a century later, Van Valen took advantage of that dialogue to spawn the Red Queen hypothesis, which has become the main model to explain host‐parasite evolutionary dynamics. In brief, Van Valen's Red Queen hypothesis states that species must be in constant change to continue in the same place (Van Valen ). In that sense, antagonistic interactions between species lead to coevolution. Though reciprocal adaptation has been widely studied in host‐parasite systems, few studies have observed the predicted turnover of genotypes within a natural population in real time.In this issue, Turko et al. () provide evidence for the Red Queen hypothesis at the population level in the asexually (sporadically sexual) reproducing freshwater zooplankton Daphnia (Cladocera, Crustacea) and its seasonal endoparasite Caullerya. Using a long‐term monitoring experiment, Turko and colleagues tested whether epidemic parasitism affected the clonal turnover of Daphnia. They employed allozymes and microsatellite markers to genotype Daphnia through time, and were thus able to detect changes in genotype frequencies (i.e., clonal

Journal

EvolutionWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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