Digest: Shape‐shifting in Solanaceae flowers: The influence of pollinators*

Digest: Shape‐shifting in Solanaceae flowers: The influence of pollinators* Aside from climate, plant–pollinator interactions are thought to be one of the main drivers of diversification in tropical plant lineages (Fig. ; Gentry ; Pérez‐Escobar et al. ). It has been argued that the great variation in angiosperm flowers is largely influenced by pollinator‐mediated selection (Sauquet et al. ), a force that has also been linked with diversification of large groups within the flowering plants, such as orchids (Pérez‐Escobar et al. ). Micro‐evolutionary studies aimed at understanding mechanisms underpinning changes in observed phenotypes have clearly demonstrated that pollinator shifts are strongly correlated with changes in floral traits (e.g., Aquilegia; Whittall and Hodges ). The importance of pollinator‐mediated selection in driving divergence at a macro‐evolutionary scale, however, remains unclear.Examples of floral diversity within Solanaceae, a plant family that includes important food crops (e.g., potatoes, tomatoes) but also a diversity of floral forms, including large flowers found in tropical lianas and epiphytes (Orejuela et al. ). (A) Brugmansia sanguinea. (B) Dunalia spinosa. (C) Browallia speciosa. (D) Deprea ecuatoriana. (E) Schultesianthus crosbianus. (F) Petunia patagonica. (G) Markea longiflora. (H) Nicotiana otophora. (I) Solanum whalenii. (J) Witheringia sp. (K) Physalis pruinosa.Photographs: A, B, Jhoana Castillo; C, D, Andrés Orejuela; E, Alex Monro; F, Steven Dodsworth; G, André http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolution Wiley

Digest: Shape‐shifting in Solanaceae flowers: The influence of pollinators*

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018, Society for the Study of Evolution
ISSN
0014-3820
eISSN
1558-5646
D.O.I.
10.1111/evo.13437
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aside from climate, plant–pollinator interactions are thought to be one of the main drivers of diversification in tropical plant lineages (Fig. ; Gentry ; Pérez‐Escobar et al. ). It has been argued that the great variation in angiosperm flowers is largely influenced by pollinator‐mediated selection (Sauquet et al. ), a force that has also been linked with diversification of large groups within the flowering plants, such as orchids (Pérez‐Escobar et al. ). Micro‐evolutionary studies aimed at understanding mechanisms underpinning changes in observed phenotypes have clearly demonstrated that pollinator shifts are strongly correlated with changes in floral traits (e.g., Aquilegia; Whittall and Hodges ). The importance of pollinator‐mediated selection in driving divergence at a macro‐evolutionary scale, however, remains unclear.Examples of floral diversity within Solanaceae, a plant family that includes important food crops (e.g., potatoes, tomatoes) but also a diversity of floral forms, including large flowers found in tropical lianas and epiphytes (Orejuela et al. ). (A) Brugmansia sanguinea. (B) Dunalia spinosa. (C) Browallia speciosa. (D) Deprea ecuatoriana. (E) Schultesianthus crosbianus. (F) Petunia patagonica. (G) Markea longiflora. (H) Nicotiana otophora. (I) Solanum whalenii. (J) Witheringia sp. (K) Physalis pruinosa.Photographs: A, B, Jhoana Castillo; C, D, Andrés Orejuela; E, Alex Monro; F, Steven Dodsworth; G, André

Journal

EvolutionWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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