Differentiating work autonomy facets in a non‐Western context

Differentiating work autonomy facets in a non‐Western context Work autonomy is one important component of job design theory which in recent decades has been elaborated upon by a number of researchers who have argued that it may be disaggregated into separate work method, work schedule and work criterion autonomy facets. Breaugh (1985) developed the Work Autonomy Scales as measures of each of these. This article reports the results of two studies carried out in Egypt that explored the validity of Breaugh's scales in relation to job design theory. In Study 1, in which Breaugh's scales were administered to 534 employees in two large Egyptian organizations, the Work Autonomy Scales' three‐factor structure was verified using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. In Study 2, using a sample of 120 managers from four organizations, the associations between the three facets of work autonomy and other variables with which they would be expected to correlate, along with their relationships with a number of outcome variables, were explored. Statistically significant correlations were observed between certain of the work autonomy scales and task interdependence, Hackman and Oldham's autonomy scale and job complexity. In terms of outcomes, work schedule autonomy was associated with job commitment, while work criterion autonomy was associated with job satisfaction. The results are discussed in the light of previous findings and some suggestions for future research are offered. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Organizational Behavior Wiley

Differentiating work autonomy facets in a non‐Western context

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
0894-3796
eISSN
1099-1379
DOI
10.1002/job.200
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Work autonomy is one important component of job design theory which in recent decades has been elaborated upon by a number of researchers who have argued that it may be disaggregated into separate work method, work schedule and work criterion autonomy facets. Breaugh (1985) developed the Work Autonomy Scales as measures of each of these. This article reports the results of two studies carried out in Egypt that explored the validity of Breaugh's scales in relation to job design theory. In Study 1, in which Breaugh's scales were administered to 534 employees in two large Egyptian organizations, the Work Autonomy Scales' three‐factor structure was verified using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. In Study 2, using a sample of 120 managers from four organizations, the associations between the three facets of work autonomy and other variables with which they would be expected to correlate, along with their relationships with a number of outcome variables, were explored. Statistically significant correlations were observed between certain of the work autonomy scales and task interdependence, Hackman and Oldham's autonomy scale and job complexity. In terms of outcomes, work schedule autonomy was associated with job commitment, while work criterion autonomy was associated with job satisfaction. The results are discussed in the light of previous findings and some suggestions for future research are offered. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Journal of Organizational BehaviorWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2003

References

  • Organizational development in the Arab world
    Ali Abbas, Ali Abbas
  • Relations between work group characteristic and effectiveness: implications for designing effective work groups
    Campion, Campion; Medsker, Medsker; Higgs, Higgs
  • Knowledge worker team effectiveness: the role of autonomy, interdependence, team development and contextual support variables
    Janez, Janez; Colquitt, Colquitt; Noe, Noe
  • Team leader autonomy in new product development
    Pinnington, Pinnington; Haslop, Haslop
  • Handbook of organizational measurement
    Price, Price
  • Location, location, location: contextualizing organizational research
    Rousseau, Rousseau; Fried, Fried
  • Interdependence and group effectiveness
    Wageman, Wageman
  • Islamic work ethic: a moderator between organizational commitment and job satisfaction in cross‐cultural context
    Yousef, Yousef

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