Differential effects of laminar stimulation of V1 cortex on target selection by macaque monkeys

Differential effects of laminar stimulation of V1 cortex on target selection by macaque monkeys We explored the effects of microstimulation on target selection by delivering stimulation at different depths within V1 (striate cortex) of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). Stimulation evoked saccadic eye movements that terminated in the receptive‐field location of the activated neurons. The current thresholds for saccade evocation were highest (≥ 30 µA) in the superficial layers and lowest (≤ 10 µA) in the deep layers. To study target selection, one visual target was presented in the receptive‐field location of the stimulated neurons and a second visual target was presented outside this location. Microstimulation delivered in concert with the appearance of the two targets decreased the probability that a monkey would select the target placed in the receptive‐field location when the upper layers of V1 were stimulated, and it increased this probability when the lower layers were stimulated. We suggest that microstimulation of the upper layers of V1 disrupts visual signals from retina en route to higher cortical areas, whereas microstimulation of the lower layers activates V1 efferents that innervate the oculomotor system. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Neuroscience Wiley

Differential effects of laminar stimulation of V1 cortex on target selection by macaque monkeys

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0953-816X
eISSN
1460-9568
DOI
10.1046/j.1460-9568.2002.02123.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We explored the effects of microstimulation on target selection by delivering stimulation at different depths within V1 (striate cortex) of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). Stimulation evoked saccadic eye movements that terminated in the receptive‐field location of the activated neurons. The current thresholds for saccade evocation were highest (≥ 30 µA) in the superficial layers and lowest (≤ 10 µA) in the deep layers. To study target selection, one visual target was presented in the receptive‐field location of the stimulated neurons and a second visual target was presented outside this location. Microstimulation delivered in concert with the appearance of the two targets decreased the probability that a monkey would select the target placed in the receptive‐field location when the upper layers of V1 were stimulated, and it increased this probability when the lower layers were stimulated. We suggest that microstimulation of the upper layers of V1 disrupts visual signals from retina en route to higher cortical areas, whereas microstimulation of the lower layers activates V1 efferents that innervate the oculomotor system.

Journal

European Journal of NeuroscienceWiley

Published: Aug 1, 2002

References

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