Dietary potassium and cardiovascular profile. Results from the modification of diet in renal disease dataset

Dietary potassium and cardiovascular profile. Results from the modification of diet in renal... Editor:We have recently reported that dietary potassium correlates negatively with body mass index (BMI) and proteinuria. Moreover, high potassium diets have a protective effect against the development of vascular damage induced by salt loading. In an effort to dissect the possible mechanisms of the benefits of dietary potassium, we studied the relationship between daily potassium intake and several markers of interest to cardiovascular disease and hypertension.We performed analysis on the baseline data of the National Institute of Health‐funded Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study. We performed bivariate correlation (Pearson) between dietary potassium (food only) intake and BUN‐to‐creatinine ratio (BUN:Cr), serum calcium (mg/dL), hematocrit (%), hemoglobin A1C (%), serum uric acid (mg/dL), and stroke volume (SV) estimated according to a validated equation using noninvasive parameters. Our results revealed a significant positive correlation between daily potassium intake and BUN:Cr, hematocrit, and serum calcium and significant negative correlation with SV, serum uric acid, and hemoglobin A1C. The descriptive statistics of the variables studied, and bivariate correlations with dietary potassium are shown in Table.Descriptive statistics and correlationsVariablesNMinimumMaximumMeanStd. deviationPearson correlation with dietary KPDiet potassium, food only (meq/24 h)53389.3139.637.413.1Stroke volume285415.3101.441.29.2−0.038.04BUN/Cr28465.861.315.24.50.131<.001Serum uric acid (mg/dL)11061.717.47.61.7−0.074.01Calcium (mg/dL)28275.911.99.10.50.052.006Hematocrit (%)277719.060.039.05.60.074<.001Hemoglobin A1c (%)10933.815.05.70.9−0.069.02The statistical associations of dietary potassium intake with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Hypertension Wiley

Dietary potassium and cardiovascular profile. Results from the modification of diet in renal disease dataset

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1524-6175
eISSN
1751-7176
D.O.I.
10.1111/jch.13207
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editor:We have recently reported that dietary potassium correlates negatively with body mass index (BMI) and proteinuria. Moreover, high potassium diets have a protective effect against the development of vascular damage induced by salt loading. In an effort to dissect the possible mechanisms of the benefits of dietary potassium, we studied the relationship between daily potassium intake and several markers of interest to cardiovascular disease and hypertension.We performed analysis on the baseline data of the National Institute of Health‐funded Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study. We performed bivariate correlation (Pearson) between dietary potassium (food only) intake and BUN‐to‐creatinine ratio (BUN:Cr), serum calcium (mg/dL), hematocrit (%), hemoglobin A1C (%), serum uric acid (mg/dL), and stroke volume (SV) estimated according to a validated equation using noninvasive parameters. Our results revealed a significant positive correlation between daily potassium intake and BUN:Cr, hematocrit, and serum calcium and significant negative correlation with SV, serum uric acid, and hemoglobin A1C. The descriptive statistics of the variables studied, and bivariate correlations with dietary potassium are shown in Table.Descriptive statistics and correlationsVariablesNMinimumMaximumMeanStd. deviationPearson correlation with dietary KPDiet potassium, food only (meq/24 h)53389.3139.637.413.1Stroke volume285415.3101.441.29.2−0.038.04BUN/Cr28465.861.315.24.50.131<.001Serum uric acid (mg/dL)11061.717.47.61.7−0.074.01Calcium (mg/dL)28275.911.99.10.50.052.006Hematocrit (%)277719.060.039.05.60.074<.001Hemoglobin A1c (%)10933.815.05.70.9−0.069.02The statistical associations of dietary potassium intake with

Journal

Journal of Clinical HypertensionWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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