Dietary n‐3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate purified murine T‐cell subset activation

Dietary n‐3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate purified murine T‐cell subset activation Studies in humans and murine disease models have clearly shown dietary fish oil to possess anti‐inflammatory properties, apparently mediated by the n‐3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). To determine the mechanisms by which dietary EPA and DHA modulate mouse T‐cell activation, female C57BL/6 mice were fed diets containing either 2% safflower oil (SAF), 2% fish oil (FO), or a 2% purified EPA/DHA ethyl ester mixture for 14 days. Splenic CD4 T cells (∼90% purity) or CD8 T cells (∼85% purity) were incubated with agonists which act at the plasma membrane receptor level (anti(α)‐CD3/anti(α)‐CD28), the intracellular level (PMA/Ionomycin), or at both the receptor and intracellular levels (αCD3/PMA). CD4 T cells stimulated with αCD3/αCD28 or PMA/Ionomycin proliferated and produced principally IL‐2 (i.e. a Th1 phenotype), whereas the proliferation of CD4 T cells stimulated with αCD3/PMA was apparently driven principally by IL‐4 (i.e. a Th2 phenotype). The IL‐4 driven proliferation of putative Th2 CD4 cells was enhanced by dietary n‐3 fatty acids (P = 0·02). Conversely, IL‐2 production by αCD3/α CD28‐stimulated CD4 T cells was reduced in FO‐fed animals (P < 0·0001). The αCD3/αCD28‐stimulated CD8 cells cultured from FO‐fed animals exhibited a significant decrease (P < 0·05) in proliferation. There were no dietary effects seen in αCD3/PMA‐stimulated CD8 cells, which produced both IL‐2 and IL‐4, or in PMA/Ionomycin‐stimulated CD8 cells, which produced principally IL‐2. These data suggest that dietary n‐3 fatty acids down‐regulated IL‐2 driven CD4 and CD8 activation, while up‐regulating the activation of the Th2 CD4 T‐cell subset. Thus, the anti‐inflammatory effects of n‐3 fatty acids may result in both the direct suppression of IL‐2‐induced Th1 cell activation and the indirect suppression of Th1 cells by the enhanced cross‐regulatory function of Th2 cells. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical & Experimental Immunology Wiley

Dietary n‐3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate purified murine T‐cell subset activation

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/dietary-n-3-polyunsaturated-fatty-acids-modulate-purified-murine-t-0KNC3U7ZD2
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0009-9104
eISSN
1365-2249
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2249.2001.01627.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Studies in humans and murine disease models have clearly shown dietary fish oil to possess anti‐inflammatory properties, apparently mediated by the n‐3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). To determine the mechanisms by which dietary EPA and DHA modulate mouse T‐cell activation, female C57BL/6 mice were fed diets containing either 2% safflower oil (SAF), 2% fish oil (FO), or a 2% purified EPA/DHA ethyl ester mixture for 14 days. Splenic CD4 T cells (∼90% purity) or CD8 T cells (∼85% purity) were incubated with agonists which act at the plasma membrane receptor level (anti(α)‐CD3/anti(α)‐CD28), the intracellular level (PMA/Ionomycin), or at both the receptor and intracellular levels (αCD3/PMA). CD4 T cells stimulated with αCD3/αCD28 or PMA/Ionomycin proliferated and produced principally IL‐2 (i.e. a Th1 phenotype), whereas the proliferation of CD4 T cells stimulated with αCD3/PMA was apparently driven principally by IL‐4 (i.e. a Th2 phenotype). The IL‐4 driven proliferation of putative Th2 CD4 cells was enhanced by dietary n‐3 fatty acids (P = 0·02). Conversely, IL‐2 production by αCD3/α CD28‐stimulated CD4 T cells was reduced in FO‐fed animals (P < 0·0001). The αCD3/αCD28‐stimulated CD8 cells cultured from FO‐fed animals exhibited a significant decrease (P < 0·05) in proliferation. There were no dietary effects seen in αCD3/PMA‐stimulated CD8 cells, which produced both IL‐2 and IL‐4, or in PMA/Ionomycin‐stimulated CD8 cells, which produced principally IL‐2. These data suggest that dietary n‐3 fatty acids down‐regulated IL‐2 driven CD4 and CD8 activation, while up‐regulating the activation of the Th2 CD4 T‐cell subset. Thus, the anti‐inflammatory effects of n‐3 fatty acids may result in both the direct suppression of IL‐2‐induced Th1 cell activation and the indirect suppression of Th1 cells by the enhanced cross‐regulatory function of Th2 cells.

Journal

Clinical & Experimental ImmunologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2001

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off