Dietary Lycopene: Its Properties and Anticarcinogenic Effects

Dietary Lycopene: Its Properties and Anticarcinogenic Effects ABSTRACT: Lycopene is the principal pigment of the carotenoids naturally found in tomatoes and is important not only because of the color it imparts but also because of the recognized health benefits associated with its presence. Red tomatoes typically contain about 95% of their lycopene as the all‐trans isomer, the most stable form. In tangerine tomatoes, on the other hand, the lycopene is present as tetra‐cis‐lycopene, a geometric isomer of all‐trans lycopene. Lycopene is a major component found in blood serum. This carotenoid has been extensively studied for its antioxidant and cancer‐preventing properties. Prevention of heart disease has been shown to be another antioxidant role played by lycopene because it reduces the accumulation of platelets that eventually lead to blood clots, heart attacks, and strokes. In contrast to many other food phytonutrients whose effects have only been studied in animals, lycopene from tomatoes has been repeatedly studied in humans and found to be protective against several cancers, which now include colorectal, prostate, breast, lung, and pancreatic cancers. This review outlines the background information dealing with lycopene and presents the most comprehensive and current understanding of its potential functional role in human health. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety Wiley

Dietary Lycopene: Its Properties and Anticarcinogenic Effects

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2008 Institute of Food Technologists
ISSN
1541-4337
eISSN
1541-4337
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1541-4337.2008.00044.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Lycopene is the principal pigment of the carotenoids naturally found in tomatoes and is important not only because of the color it imparts but also because of the recognized health benefits associated with its presence. Red tomatoes typically contain about 95% of their lycopene as the all‐trans isomer, the most stable form. In tangerine tomatoes, on the other hand, the lycopene is present as tetra‐cis‐lycopene, a geometric isomer of all‐trans lycopene. Lycopene is a major component found in blood serum. This carotenoid has been extensively studied for its antioxidant and cancer‐preventing properties. Prevention of heart disease has been shown to be another antioxidant role played by lycopene because it reduces the accumulation of platelets that eventually lead to blood clots, heart attacks, and strokes. In contrast to many other food phytonutrients whose effects have only been studied in animals, lycopene from tomatoes has been repeatedly studied in humans and found to be protective against several cancers, which now include colorectal, prostate, breast, lung, and pancreatic cancers. This review outlines the background information dealing with lycopene and presents the most comprehensive and current understanding of its potential functional role in human health.

Journal

Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food SafetyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2008

References

  • Tomato lycopene and low‐density lipoprotein oxidation: a human dietary intervention study
    Agarwal, Agarwal; Rao, Rao
  • Dietary uptake of lycopene protects human cells from singlet oxygen and nitrogen dioxide‐ROS components from cigarette smoke
    Bohm, Bohm; Edge, Edge; Burke, Burke; Truscott, Truscott
  • Effects of freezing and canning of papaya slices on their carotenoid composition
    Cano, Cano; Ancos, Ancos; Lobo, Lobo; Monreal, Monreal; De Ancos, De Ancos
  • The stability of lycopene. I. Degradation by oxygen
    Cole, Cole; Kapur, Kapur
  • The stability of lycopene. II. Oxidation during heating of tomato pulps
    Cole, Cole; Kapur, Kapur
  • A quantitative assay for lycopene that utilizes reduced volumes of organic solvents
    Fish, Fish; Veazie, Veazie; Collins, Collins
  • Tomatoes and risk of digestive‐tract cancers
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    Glaser, Glaser; Lienau, Lienau; Zeeb, Zeeb; Krucker, Krucker; Dachtler, Dachtler; Albert, Albert
  • Prediction of lycopene degradation during a drying process of tomato pulp
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  • Development and evaluation of an HPLC method for the analysis of carotenoids in food, and the measurement of the carotenoid content of vegetables and fruits commonly consumed in the UK
    Hart, Hart; Scott, Scott

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