Dietary intake in people consuming a low‐carbohydrate diet in the UK Biobank

Dietary intake in people consuming a low‐carbohydrate diet in the UK Biobank IntroductionLow‐carbohydrate diets (LCHO) are becoming increasingly popular. In the UK, it was reported that 3 million people had tried the LCHO diet in 2003 , with the Atkins diet books alone having sold over 45 million books in the latter half of the 20th century . Carbohydrate (CHO) restriction, where the restriction is sufficient and adhered to , appears to confer particular metabolic benefits for the management of type 2 diabetes , including a reduction in post‐prandial glycaemia. However, the long‐term health effects in the wider population are not clear. This raises questions of its long‐term safety and efficacy, which warrants ongoing investigation into the dietary habits of such individuals .It is important to note that there is no singular definition of what constitutes a LCHO diet, although a CHO content comprising <26% of calories (or <130 g CHO) has been suggested as a cut‐off . Variations of the LCHO diet differ in their permitted levels of macronutrients, such as the low‐carbohydrate, high‐fat diet, which emphasises the importance of increasing fat consumption , whereas others increase protein to a greater degree . Absolute intakes (i.e. additional grammes) of protein or fat may not increase at all, mirroring a low calorie http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Nutrition & Dietetics Wiley

Dietary intake in people consuming a low‐carbohydrate diet in the UK Biobank

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 The British Dietetic Association Ltd
ISSN
0952-3871
eISSN
1365-277X
D.O.I.
10.1111/jhn.12527
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionLow‐carbohydrate diets (LCHO) are becoming increasingly popular. In the UK, it was reported that 3 million people had tried the LCHO diet in 2003 , with the Atkins diet books alone having sold over 45 million books in the latter half of the 20th century . Carbohydrate (CHO) restriction, where the restriction is sufficient and adhered to , appears to confer particular metabolic benefits for the management of type 2 diabetes , including a reduction in post‐prandial glycaemia. However, the long‐term health effects in the wider population are not clear. This raises questions of its long‐term safety and efficacy, which warrants ongoing investigation into the dietary habits of such individuals .It is important to note that there is no singular definition of what constitutes a LCHO diet, although a CHO content comprising <26% of calories (or <130 g CHO) has been suggested as a cut‐off . Variations of the LCHO diet differ in their permitted levels of macronutrients, such as the low‐carbohydrate, high‐fat diet, which emphasises the importance of increasing fat consumption , whereas others increase protein to a greater degree . Absolute intakes (i.e. additional grammes) of protein or fat may not increase at all, mirroring a low calorie

Journal

Journal of Human Nutrition & DieteticsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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