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Developmental tasks of childhood and adolescence: Implications for genetic testing

Developmental tasks of childhood and adolescence: Implications for genetic testing Many reports have recently recommended a careful weighing of the potential benefits and harms of genetic testing (carrier or predisposition) of children and adolescents [Andrews et al., Washington DC: National Academy Press, 1994; Wertz et al., JAMA, 272:875‐881, 1994; Clinical Genetics Society (UK), J Med Genet, 31:785‐797, 1994; ASHJ/ACMG, Am J Hum Genet, 57:1233‐1241, 1995]. Despite this, youngsters are currently being tested for late‐onset disorders as well as for carrier status [Reilly and Wertz, Am J Hum Genet, 57:A57, 1995]. Many children to be tested will be those in at‐risk families, who may already have experienced the chronic illness or death of a close relative. Thus, reactions to testing will be influenced by prior family experiences. Emotional reactions to testing will be determined by both the child's cognitive and psychosocial development. Testing of adolescents may alter the achievement of developmental tasks, including seeking freedom from parental figures, establishment of personal identity, handling of sexual energies, and remodeling of former idealizations of self and others. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A Wiley

Developmental tasks of childhood and adolescence: Implications for genetic testing

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1552-4825
eISSN
1552-4833
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1096-8628(19970711)71:1<22::AID-AJMG4>3.0.CO;2-S
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many reports have recently recommended a careful weighing of the potential benefits and harms of genetic testing (carrier or predisposition) of children and adolescents [Andrews et al., Washington DC: National Academy Press, 1994; Wertz et al., JAMA, 272:875‐881, 1994; Clinical Genetics Society (UK), J Med Genet, 31:785‐797, 1994; ASHJ/ACMG, Am J Hum Genet, 57:1233‐1241, 1995]. Despite this, youngsters are currently being tested for late‐onset disorders as well as for carrier status [Reilly and Wertz, Am J Hum Genet, 57:A57, 1995]. Many children to be tested will be those in at‐risk families, who may already have experienced the chronic illness or death of a close relative. Thus, reactions to testing will be influenced by prior family experiences. Emotional reactions to testing will be determined by both the child's cognitive and psychosocial development. Testing of adolescents may alter the achievement of developmental tasks, including seeking freedom from parental figures, establishment of personal identity, handling of sexual energies, and remodeling of former idealizations of self and others.

Journal

American Journal of Medical Genetics Part AWiley

Published: Nov 11, 1997

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References