Development of a murine model to evaluate the effect of vernix caseosa on skin barrier recovery

Development of a murine model to evaluate the effect of vernix caseosa on skin barrier recovery Abstract: The aim of this study was twofold, that is the generation of a reliable model for skin barrier disruption and repair and to evaluate recovery of damaged skin after application of vernix caseosa (VC). VC was selected as its wound healing properties were suggested previously, but never clearly demonstrated. Five different levels of barrier disruption in mice, accomplished by tape‐stripping, were evaluated. Disruption models such as moderate, severe #1 and #2 (transepidermal water loss (TEWL) of 31 ± 2, 59 ± 4 and 66 ± 3 g/m2/h, respectively) showed complete recovery within 72 h. However, not all corneocytes were removed after tape‐stripping. Additionally, models such as severe #3 and #4 (TEWL of 73 ± 5 and 79 ± 6 g/m2/h, respectively) with a more severe disruption were evaluated. After tape‐stripping, all corneocytes were removed and the remaining epidermis was intact. However, model #3 still showed complete recovery within 72 h. With model #4, a crust was formed and almost complete recovery (approximately 90%) was obtained within only 8 days. The effect of VC application on recovery of disrupted skin was evaluated with model #3 and #4. Model #3 showed that application of VC predominantly influenced initial recovery and is therefore merely appropriate to study the effect of formulations in the initial recovery period. Topical application of VC on model #4 considerably increased initial and long‐term recovery. Moreover, VC application promoted rapid formation of stratum corneum and prevented epidermal thickening. These observations not only confirm the ability of VC to enhance barrier recovery, but also suggest potential use of this treatment clinically. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experimental Dermatology Wiley

Development of a murine model to evaluate the effect of vernix caseosa on skin barrier recovery

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Munksgaard
ISSN
0906-6705
eISSN
1600-0625
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0625.2008.00780.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: The aim of this study was twofold, that is the generation of a reliable model for skin barrier disruption and repair and to evaluate recovery of damaged skin after application of vernix caseosa (VC). VC was selected as its wound healing properties were suggested previously, but never clearly demonstrated. Five different levels of barrier disruption in mice, accomplished by tape‐stripping, were evaluated. Disruption models such as moderate, severe #1 and #2 (transepidermal water loss (TEWL) of 31 ± 2, 59 ± 4 and 66 ± 3 g/m2/h, respectively) showed complete recovery within 72 h. However, not all corneocytes were removed after tape‐stripping. Additionally, models such as severe #3 and #4 (TEWL of 73 ± 5 and 79 ± 6 g/m2/h, respectively) with a more severe disruption were evaluated. After tape‐stripping, all corneocytes were removed and the remaining epidermis was intact. However, model #3 still showed complete recovery within 72 h. With model #4, a crust was formed and almost complete recovery (approximately 90%) was obtained within only 8 days. The effect of VC application on recovery of disrupted skin was evaluated with model #3 and #4. Model #3 showed that application of VC predominantly influenced initial recovery and is therefore merely appropriate to study the effect of formulations in the initial recovery period. Topical application of VC on model #4 considerably increased initial and long‐term recovery. Moreover, VC application promoted rapid formation of stratum corneum and prevented epidermal thickening. These observations not only confirm the ability of VC to enhance barrier recovery, but also suggest potential use of this treatment clinically.

Journal

Experimental DermatologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2009

References

  • Topical stratum corneum lipids accelerate barrier repair after tape stripping, solvent treatment and some but not all types of detergent treatment
    Yang, Yang; Mao‐Qiang, Mao‐Qiang; Taljebini, Taljebini; Elias, Elias; Feingold, Feingold
  • Transepidermal water loss reflects permeability barrier status: validation in human and rodent in vivo and ex vivo models
    Fluhr, Fluhr; Feingold, Feingold; Elias, Elias
  • Host defense proteins in vernix caseosa and amniotic fluid
    Akinbi, Akinbi; Narendran, Narendran; Pass, Pass; Markart, Markart; Hoath, Hoath
  • The biology of vernix caseosa
    Hoath, Hoath; Pickens, Pickens; Visscher, Visscher

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