Deuterium variations in storm rainfall: Implications for stream hydrograph separation

Deuterium variations in storm rainfall: Implications for stream hydrograph separation Isotopic variation in storm rainfall is an important consideration in hydrograph separation using the mass balance approach but is rarely considered when determining the accuracy of old water estimates. Study of a small watershed on the South Island of New Zealand in which new water is a major component of the storm hydrograph shows that, in addition to the within‐storm isotopic variations themselves, rainfall weighting techniques may substantially influence estimates of old/new water as a function of both total runoff and total quick flow production. Two incremental approaches to rainfall weighting are presented. Results show that within‐storm incremental weighting is better than the standard weighting technique, which imposes a total storm rainfall value exogenously on the mass balance equation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

Deuterium variations in storm rainfall: Implications for stream hydrograph separation

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
D.O.I.
10.1029/WR026i003p00455
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Isotopic variation in storm rainfall is an important consideration in hydrograph separation using the mass balance approach but is rarely considered when determining the accuracy of old water estimates. Study of a small watershed on the South Island of New Zealand in which new water is a major component of the storm hydrograph shows that, in addition to the within‐storm isotopic variations themselves, rainfall weighting techniques may substantially influence estimates of old/new water as a function of both total runoff and total quick flow production. Two incremental approaches to rainfall weighting are presented. Results show that within‐storm incremental weighting is better than the standard weighting technique, which imposes a total storm rainfall value exogenously on the mass balance equation.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1990

References

  • Variations of rain chemistry during storms at two sites in Northern California
    Kennedy, Kennedy; Zellweger, Zellweger; Avanzino, Avanzino
  • Storm runoff generation in humid headwater catchments, 1, Where does the water come from?
    Pearce, Pearce; Stewart, Stewart; Sklash, Sklash
  • Storm runoff generation in humid headwater catchments, 2, A case study of hillslope and low‐order stream response
    Sklash, Sklash; Stewart, Stewart; Pearce, Pearce

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