Determining alternative models for vegetation response analysis: a non‐parametric approach

Determining alternative models for vegetation response analysis: a non‐parametric approach Abstract. Vegetation models based on multiple logistic regression are of growing interest in environmental studies and decision making. The relatively simple sigmoid Gaussian optimum curves are most common in current vegetation models, although several different other response shapes are known. However, improvements in the technical means for handling statistical data now facilitate fast and interactive calculation of alternative complex, more data‐related, non‐parametric models. The aim in this study was to determine whether, and if so how often, a complex response shape could be more adequate than a linear or quadratic one. Using the framework of Generalized Additive Models, both parametric (linear and quadratic) and non‐parametric (smoothed) stepwise multiple logistic regression techniques were applied to a large data set on wetlands and water plants and to six environmental variables: pH, chloride, orthophosphate, inorganic nitrogen, thickness of the sapropelium layer and depth of the water‐body. All models were tested for their goodness‐of‐fit and significance. Of all 156 generalized additive models calculated, 77 % were found to contain at least one smoothed predictor variable, i.e. an environmental variable with a response better fitted by a complex, non‐parametric, than by a linear or quadratic parametric curve. Chloride was the variable with the highest incidence of smoothed responses (48 %). Generally, a smoothed curve was preferable in 23 % of all species‐variable correlations calculated, compared to 25 % and 18 % for sigmoid and Gaussian shaped curves, respectively. Regression models of two plant species are presented in detail to illustrate the potential of smoothers to produce good fitting and biologically sound response models in comparison to linear and polynomial regression models. We found Generalized Additive Modelling a useful and practical technique for improving current regression‐based vegetation models by allowing for alternative, complex response shapes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Vegetation Science Wiley

Determining alternative models for vegetation response analysis: a non‐parametric approach

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/determining-alternative-models-for-vegetation-response-analysis-a-non-tjh9wlbruA
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1998 IAVS ‐ the International Association of Vegetation Science
ISSN
1100-9233
eISSN
1654-1103
D.O.I.
10.2307/3237218
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Vegetation models based on multiple logistic regression are of growing interest in environmental studies and decision making. The relatively simple sigmoid Gaussian optimum curves are most common in current vegetation models, although several different other response shapes are known. However, improvements in the technical means for handling statistical data now facilitate fast and interactive calculation of alternative complex, more data‐related, non‐parametric models. The aim in this study was to determine whether, and if so how often, a complex response shape could be more adequate than a linear or quadratic one. Using the framework of Generalized Additive Models, both parametric (linear and quadratic) and non‐parametric (smoothed) stepwise multiple logistic regression techniques were applied to a large data set on wetlands and water plants and to six environmental variables: pH, chloride, orthophosphate, inorganic nitrogen, thickness of the sapropelium layer and depth of the water‐body. All models were tested for their goodness‐of‐fit and significance. Of all 156 generalized additive models calculated, 77 % were found to contain at least one smoothed predictor variable, i.e. an environmental variable with a response better fitted by a complex, non‐parametric, than by a linear or quadratic parametric curve. Chloride was the variable with the highest incidence of smoothed responses (48 %). Generally, a smoothed curve was preferable in 23 % of all species‐variable correlations calculated, compared to 25 % and 18 % for sigmoid and Gaussian shaped curves, respectively. Regression models of two plant species are presented in detail to illustrate the potential of smoothers to produce good fitting and biologically sound response models in comparison to linear and polynomial regression models. We found Generalized Additive Modelling a useful and practical technique for improving current regression‐based vegetation models by allowing for alternative, complex response shapes.

Journal

Journal of Vegetation ScienceWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1998

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off