Determinants of diversity in a naturally fragmented landscape: humid montane forest avifaunas of Mesoamerica

Determinants of diversity in a naturally fragmented landscape: humid montane forest avifaunas of... We used a published data set summarizing avifaunas of 31 montane patches of humid forest in Mesoamerica lo analyze avian distributions with respect to site characteristics. This forest type was originally widespread in the lowlands, and became restricted to mountains during Pleistocene climatic changes. Hierarchical partitioning. a recently developed regression procedure, was used to examine independent factor effects. Total species richness, richness of Mesoamerican endemic species, richness of narrowly endemic species, and richness of habitat specialists were considered separately, each analyzed at three spatial scales. For total richness and Mesoamerican endemics, regional‐level variables, notably latitude. were most influential. Narrow endemics exhibited more complex patterns, driven by foci both in western Mexico and in Costa Rica and western Panama. Historical factors are suggested to have contributed to this latitudinal pattern, such that the isthmuses of Tehuantepec and Panama acted as barriers to range expansion and peninsular effects catalyzed speciation. elevating numbers of endemic species. In contrast to many anthropogenic fragmentation studies, area and other local‐scale patch attributes had little influence on avifaunas. This discrepancy may be related lo fundamental differences in spatial and temporal scaling, with patterns uncovered herein more indicative of long‐term community processes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecography Wiley

Determinants of diversity in a naturally fragmented landscape: humid montane forest avifaunas of Mesoamerica

Ecography, Volume 22 (5) – Dec 1, 1999

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1999 Ecography
ISSN
0906-7590
eISSN
1600-0587
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0587.1999.tb01288.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We used a published data set summarizing avifaunas of 31 montane patches of humid forest in Mesoamerica lo analyze avian distributions with respect to site characteristics. This forest type was originally widespread in the lowlands, and became restricted to mountains during Pleistocene climatic changes. Hierarchical partitioning. a recently developed regression procedure, was used to examine independent factor effects. Total species richness, richness of Mesoamerican endemic species, richness of narrowly endemic species, and richness of habitat specialists were considered separately, each analyzed at three spatial scales. For total richness and Mesoamerican endemics, regional‐level variables, notably latitude. were most influential. Narrow endemics exhibited more complex patterns, driven by foci both in western Mexico and in Costa Rica and western Panama. Historical factors are suggested to have contributed to this latitudinal pattern, such that the isthmuses of Tehuantepec and Panama acted as barriers to range expansion and peninsular effects catalyzed speciation. elevating numbers of endemic species. In contrast to many anthropogenic fragmentation studies, area and other local‐scale patch attributes had little influence on avifaunas. This discrepancy may be related lo fundamental differences in spatial and temporal scaling, with patterns uncovered herein more indicative of long‐term community processes.

Journal

EcographyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1999

References

  • Extinction rates in archipelagoes: implications for populations in fragmented habitats
    Burkey, Burkey
  • Landscape characteristics of fragmented shrubsteppe habitats and breeding passerine birds
    Knick, Knick; Rotenberry, Rotenberry
  • Birds in a farmland: more species in small than in large habitat – islands
    Loman, Loman; Shantz, Shantz
  • Problems with areal definitions of endemism: the effects of spatial scale
    Peterson, Peterson; Watson, Watson
  • Assessing habitat suitability at multiple scales: a landscape level approach
    Riitters, Riitters; O'Neill, O'Neill; Jones, Jones
  • Biological consequences of ecosystem fragmentation: a review
    Saunders, Saunders; Hobbs, Hobbs; Margules, Margules

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