DETERMINANTS OF CHOICE FOR PIGEONS AND HUMANS ON CONCURRENT‐CHAINS SCHEDULES OF REINFORCEMENT

DETERMINANTS OF CHOICE FOR PIGEONS AND HUMANS ON CONCURRENT‐CHAINS SCHEDULES OF REINFORCEMENT Concurrent‐chains schedules of reinforcement were arranged for humans and pigeons. Responses of humans were reinforced with tokens exchangeable for money, and key pecks of 4 birds were reinforced with food. Variable‐interval 30‐s and 40‐s schedules operated in the terminal links of the chains. Condition 1 exposed subjects to variable‐interval 90‐s and variable‐interval 30‐s initial links, respectively. Conditions 2 and 3 arranged equal initial‐link schedules of 40 s or 120 s. Experimental conditions tested the descriptive adequacy of five equations: reinforcement density, delay reduction, modified delay reduction, matching and maximization. Results based on choice proportions and switch rates during the initial links showed that pigeons behaved in accord with delay‐reduction models, whereas humans maximized overall rate of reinforcement. As discussed by Logue and associates in self‐control research, different types of reinforcement may affect sensitivity to delay differentially. Pigeons' responses were reinforced with food, a reinforcer that is consumable upon presentation. Humans' responses were reinforced with money, a reinforcer exchanged for consumable reinforcers after it was earned. Reinforcers that are immediately consumed may generate high sensitivity to delay and behavior described as delay reduction. Reinforcers with longer times to consumption may generate low sensitivity to delay and behavior that maximizes overall payoff. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior Wiley

DETERMINANTS OF CHOICE FOR PIGEONS AND HUMANS ON CONCURRENT‐CHAINS SCHEDULES OF REINFORCEMENT

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1989 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior
ISSN
0022-5002
eISSN
1938-3711
DOI
10.1901/jeab.1989.52-97
pmid
2794844
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Concurrent‐chains schedules of reinforcement were arranged for humans and pigeons. Responses of humans were reinforced with tokens exchangeable for money, and key pecks of 4 birds were reinforced with food. Variable‐interval 30‐s and 40‐s schedules operated in the terminal links of the chains. Condition 1 exposed subjects to variable‐interval 90‐s and variable‐interval 30‐s initial links, respectively. Conditions 2 and 3 arranged equal initial‐link schedules of 40 s or 120 s. Experimental conditions tested the descriptive adequacy of five equations: reinforcement density, delay reduction, modified delay reduction, matching and maximization. Results based on choice proportions and switch rates during the initial links showed that pigeons behaved in accord with delay‐reduction models, whereas humans maximized overall rate of reinforcement. As discussed by Logue and associates in self‐control research, different types of reinforcement may affect sensitivity to delay differentially. Pigeons' responses were reinforced with food, a reinforcer that is consumable upon presentation. Humans' responses were reinforced with money, a reinforcer exchanged for consumable reinforcers after it was earned. Reinforcers that are immediately consumed may generate high sensitivity to delay and behavior described as delay reduction. Reinforcers with longer times to consumption may generate low sensitivity to delay and behavior that maximizes overall payoff.

Journal

Journal of the Experimental Analysis of BehaviorWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1989

References

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