Detection of irradiated frozen food with the DNA comet assay: interlaboratory test

Detection of irradiated frozen food with the DNA comet assay: interlaboratory test Ionising radiation induces DNA damage in the cells of the foodstuff. This fact was used to analyse DNA from single cells by agarose gel electrophoresis (DNA comet assay). The pattern formed by the DNA after electrophoresis (DNA comet) was visualised in a microscope, where hundreds of cells could be observed in a short time. Irradiated cells showed comets with long tails, while unirradiated cells showed no tail or very short ones. An estimation of the dose was made based on the shape of the comets. Nine laboratories, from Berlin, Berne, Chipping Campden, Karlsruhe, Copenhagen, Strasbourg, Uppsala and Warsaw, participated in a test to assess the validity of the method. The test material consisted of code‐labelled cell suspensions made of irradiated and unirradiated chicken bone marrow, chicken and pork muscle tissue. The doses varied between 0 and 5 kGy. Samples of chicken bone marrow were used as references. A total of 162 test samples were sent for analysis. Results of analysis from 148 samples were reported. Of these, 138 were correctly identified. Six laboratories succeeded in identifying all the samples. In the group of 106 irradiated samples, 99 were correctly detected, while 39 out of 42 unirradiated samples were correctly detected. It is concluded that the comet assay can be used to detect frozen irradiated food. © 1998 SCI. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture Wiley

Detection of irradiated frozen food with the DNA comet assay: interlaboratory test

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/detection-of-irradiated-frozen-food-with-the-dna-comet-assay-6F9zogc6LJ
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 SCI
ISSN
0022-5142
eISSN
1097-0010
D.O.I.
10.1002/(SICI)1097-0010(199803)76:3<435::AID-JSFA969>3.0.CO;2-X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ionising radiation induces DNA damage in the cells of the foodstuff. This fact was used to analyse DNA from single cells by agarose gel electrophoresis (DNA comet assay). The pattern formed by the DNA after electrophoresis (DNA comet) was visualised in a microscope, where hundreds of cells could be observed in a short time. Irradiated cells showed comets with long tails, while unirradiated cells showed no tail or very short ones. An estimation of the dose was made based on the shape of the comets. Nine laboratories, from Berlin, Berne, Chipping Campden, Karlsruhe, Copenhagen, Strasbourg, Uppsala and Warsaw, participated in a test to assess the validity of the method. The test material consisted of code‐labelled cell suspensions made of irradiated and unirradiated chicken bone marrow, chicken and pork muscle tissue. The doses varied between 0 and 5 kGy. Samples of chicken bone marrow were used as references. A total of 162 test samples were sent for analysis. Results of analysis from 148 samples were reported. Of these, 138 were correctly identified. Six laboratories succeeded in identifying all the samples. In the group of 106 irradiated samples, 99 were correctly detected, while 39 out of 42 unirradiated samples were correctly detected. It is concluded that the comet assay can be used to detect frozen irradiated food. © 1998 SCI.

Journal

Journal of the Science of Food and AgricultureWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1998

References

  • Identification of low dose irradiated seeds using the neutral comet assay
    Koppen, Koppen; Cerda, Cerda

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off