DETECTION OF CHICKEN FLESH IN BEEF SAUSAGES

DETECTION OF CHICKEN FLESH IN BEEF SAUSAGES ABSTRACT Antisera to chicken troponin were produced in rabbits and were effective, in agar gel diffusion reactions, for the identification of chicken flesh in those beef sausages which by law should contain no chicken. Antisera to chicken troponin were reacted with extracts of heated beef sausages containing 1, 3 and 5% chicken flesh. The results indicate that such antisera can detect chicken flesh in beef sausages adulterated at the 1, 3 and 5% levels. Species specificity was demonstrated by a lack of reactivity between rabbit antiserum to chicken troponin, beef sausages and heated pork and lamb flesh. Chances of species cross‐reactivity may increase with prolonged immunization. It is recommended that each antiserum be tested for species specificity before “pooling.” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Food Science Wiley

DETECTION OF CHICKEN FLESH IN BEEF SAUSAGES

Journal of Food Science, Volume 42 (5) – Sep 1, 1977

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1977 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-1147
eISSN
1750-3841
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2621.1977.tb14457.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Antisera to chicken troponin were produced in rabbits and were effective, in agar gel diffusion reactions, for the identification of chicken flesh in those beef sausages which by law should contain no chicken. Antisera to chicken troponin were reacted with extracts of heated beef sausages containing 1, 3 and 5% chicken flesh. The results indicate that such antisera can detect chicken flesh in beef sausages adulterated at the 1, 3 and 5% levels. Species specificity was demonstrated by a lack of reactivity between rabbit antiserum to chicken troponin, beef sausages and heated pork and lamb flesh. Chances of species cross‐reactivity may increase with prolonged immunization. It is recommended that each antiserum be tested for species specificity before “pooling.”

Journal

Journal of Food ScienceWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1977

References

  • Application of SDS‐Acrylamide Gel electrophoresis for determination of the maximum temperature to which bovine muscles have been cooked
    Lee, Lee; Rickansrud, Rickansrud; Hagberg, Hagberg; Briskey, Briskey

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