Desert‐dwelling Mountain Sheep: Conservation Implications of a Naturally Fragmented Distribution

Desert‐dwelling Mountain Sheep: Conservation Implications of a Naturally Fragmented Distribution Abstract: Mountain sheep (Ovis canadensis) are closely associated with steep, mountainous, open terrain. Their habitat consequently occurs in a naturally fragmented pattern, often with substantial expanses of unsuitable habitat between suitable patches; the sheep have been noted to be slow colonizers of vacant suitable habitat. As a result, resource managers have focused on (1) conserving “traditional” mountainous habitats, and (2) forced colonization through reintroduction. Telemetry studies in desert habitats have recorded more intermountain movement by desert sheep than was previously thought to OCCUT. Given the heretofore unrecognized vagility of mountain sheep, we argue that existing corridors of “nontraditional” habitat connecting mountain ranges be given adequate conservation consideration. Additionally, small areas of mountainous habitat that an? not permanently occupied but that may serve as “stepping stones” within such corridors must be recognized for their potential importance to relatively isolated populations of mountain sheep. We discuss the potential importance of such corridors to other large, vagile species. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Desert‐dwelling Mountain Sheep: Conservation Implications of a Naturally Fragmented Distribution

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/desert-dwelling-mountain-sheep-conservation-implications-of-a-MvjU8CkgtZ
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 1990 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
DOI
10.1111/j.1523-1739.1990.tb00312.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: Mountain sheep (Ovis canadensis) are closely associated with steep, mountainous, open terrain. Their habitat consequently occurs in a naturally fragmented pattern, often with substantial expanses of unsuitable habitat between suitable patches; the sheep have been noted to be slow colonizers of vacant suitable habitat. As a result, resource managers have focused on (1) conserving “traditional” mountainous habitats, and (2) forced colonization through reintroduction. Telemetry studies in desert habitats have recorded more intermountain movement by desert sheep than was previously thought to OCCUT. Given the heretofore unrecognized vagility of mountain sheep, we argue that existing corridors of “nontraditional” habitat connecting mountain ranges be given adequate conservation consideration. Additionally, small areas of mountainous habitat that an? not permanently occupied but that may serve as “stepping stones” within such corridors must be recognized for their potential importance to relatively isolated populations of mountain sheep. We discuss the potential importance of such corridors to other large, vagile species.

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1990

References

  • Mountain sheep, a study in behavior and evolution
    Geist, V.
  • The desert bighorn sheep of Nevada
    McQuivey, R. P.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off