Depression‐ and anxiety‐like behaviour is related to BDNF/TrkB signalling in a mouse model of psoriasis

Depression‐ and anxiety‐like behaviour is related to BDNF/TrkB signalling in a mouse model of... IntroductionPsoriasis is a common chronic skin disease, and much evidence shows that there is a close correlation between this disease and anxiety/depression. Epidemiological studies strongly suggest that patients with psoriasis have a significant prevalence of anxiety and depression, and conversely, anxiety and depression can increase the prevalence of psoriasis. Furthermore, clinical data also suggest that anti‐anxiety and antidepression drugs can reduce skin lesions in patients with psoriasis. Thus, psoriasis is also referred to as a psychocutaneous disorder. Neuroendocrine dysfunction and disturbances in autoimmune inflammatory reactions in the skin and enhanced levels of T‐cell infiltrates are among several mechanisms that are thought to be the underlying causes connecting psoriasis with anxiety and depression, but the exact molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood.In recent years, there has been growing evidence to show that the brain‐derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/TrKB pathway can modulate serotonin (5‐hydroxytryptamine; 5‐HT) and other neurotransmitters, and this pathway has been implicated in the pathophysiology and treatment of depression and anxiety. Clinical data have also revealed epigenetic changes in the BDNF gene in adult male patients with anxiety and depression, and increases in BDNF levels following treatment with fluoxetine, an antidepression drug. Thus, increasing BDNF in the brain can be a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical & Experimental Dermatology Wiley

Depression‐ and anxiety‐like behaviour is related to BDNF/TrkB signalling in a mouse model of psoriasis

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 British Association of Dermatologists
ISSN
0307-6938
eISSN
1365-2230
D.O.I.
10.1111/ced.13378
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionPsoriasis is a common chronic skin disease, and much evidence shows that there is a close correlation between this disease and anxiety/depression. Epidemiological studies strongly suggest that patients with psoriasis have a significant prevalence of anxiety and depression, and conversely, anxiety and depression can increase the prevalence of psoriasis. Furthermore, clinical data also suggest that anti‐anxiety and antidepression drugs can reduce skin lesions in patients with psoriasis. Thus, psoriasis is also referred to as a psychocutaneous disorder. Neuroendocrine dysfunction and disturbances in autoimmune inflammatory reactions in the skin and enhanced levels of T‐cell infiltrates are among several mechanisms that are thought to be the underlying causes connecting psoriasis with anxiety and depression, but the exact molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood.In recent years, there has been growing evidence to show that the brain‐derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/TrKB pathway can modulate serotonin (5‐hydroxytryptamine; 5‐HT) and other neurotransmitters, and this pathway has been implicated in the pathophysiology and treatment of depression and anxiety. Clinical data have also revealed epigenetic changes in the BDNF gene in adult male patients with anxiety and depression, and increases in BDNF levels following treatment with fluoxetine, an antidepression drug. Thus, increasing BDNF in the brain can be a

Journal

Clinical & Experimental DermatologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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