Demographic Dissimilarity and Workplace Inclusion

Demographic Dissimilarity and Workplace Inclusion This study examined the relationship between individual demographic dissimilarity from co‐workers and three indicators of inclusion by an organization: decision‐making influence, access to sensitive information, and job security. Data from 345 individuals in eight work units showed that individual dissimilarity in race and gender were negatively associated with inclusion, and the effect of race dissimilarity was more pronounced for whites than for non‐whites. In contrast, individual dissimilarity in tenure and education level were positively associated with inclusion, and these effects were more pronounced for those with greater tenure and greater education, respectively. Overall, the results suggest that whether being different hinders or helps organizational inclusion may depend on whether that difference is visible and whether it reflects job expertise. Further, they suggest that, when being different is a hindrance, it may be hardest on those who have traditionally been the majority in organizations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Management Studies Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Blackwell Publishers Ltd, 1999
ISSN
0022-2380
eISSN
1467-6486
DOI
10.1111/1467-6486.00168
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between individual demographic dissimilarity from co‐workers and three indicators of inclusion by an organization: decision‐making influence, access to sensitive information, and job security. Data from 345 individuals in eight work units showed that individual dissimilarity in race and gender were negatively associated with inclusion, and the effect of race dissimilarity was more pronounced for whites than for non‐whites. In contrast, individual dissimilarity in tenure and education level were positively associated with inclusion, and these effects were more pronounced for those with greater tenure and greater education, respectively. Overall, the results suggest that whether being different hinders or helps organizational inclusion may depend on whether that difference is visible and whether it reflects job expertise. Further, they suggest that, when being different is a hindrance, it may be hardest on those who have traditionally been the majority in organizations.

Journal

Journal of Management StudiesWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1999

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