Dementia, Agitation, and Care in the Nursing Home

Dementia, Agitation, and Care in the Nursing Home Objective To examine the behavioral and functional problems of the cognitively impaired. Design A survey of a cohort of residents from six nursing homes. Participants Subjects were randomly selected based on a minimum age of 70 years and a Resource Utilization Group (RUG) classification of the Physical or Behavioral type. Of those eligible, 44% (n = 366) agreed to participate. The participants and non‐participants had similar demographics except for a higher incidence of mental illness in the non‐participant group, which did not have a significant impact on agitation. Setting Six nursing homes in New York City, three voluntary non‐profit and three proprietary. Measurement The study used chart review, assessment of residents' cognitive and functional abilities, nursing assistants' ratings of residents' functional abilities, behavioral problems, and the amount of effort required in care, and time‐motion observations of staff‐resident interactions. Results Residents' level of cognitive impairment had a significant impact on problem behaviors during ADL tasks, along with supervision required in patient care (P < 0.05). These results were validated by time‐motion analysis. Regression analysis revealed that for non‐demented subjects, the best indicator of care needs was health status, while for demented residents the best indicator was cognitive status (P < 0.0003). Conclusions The care needs of residents with dementia are better estimated by a mental status test for cognitive impairment then by ADL assessment alone. Greater agitation is associated with increasing cognitive impairment. Further, agitation and behavioral problems associated with care result in a need for increased staff supervision. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American Geriatrics Society Wiley

Dementia, Agitation, and Care in the Nursing Home

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/dementia-agitation-and-care-in-the-nursing-home-9TgAbdQ9vm
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© The American Geriatrics Society
ISSN
0002-8614
eISSN
1532-5415
DOI
10.1111/j.1532-5415.1993.tb01886.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective To examine the behavioral and functional problems of the cognitively impaired. Design A survey of a cohort of residents from six nursing homes. Participants Subjects were randomly selected based on a minimum age of 70 years and a Resource Utilization Group (RUG) classification of the Physical or Behavioral type. Of those eligible, 44% (n = 366) agreed to participate. The participants and non‐participants had similar demographics except for a higher incidence of mental illness in the non‐participant group, which did not have a significant impact on agitation. Setting Six nursing homes in New York City, three voluntary non‐profit and three proprietary. Measurement The study used chart review, assessment of residents' cognitive and functional abilities, nursing assistants' ratings of residents' functional abilities, behavioral problems, and the amount of effort required in care, and time‐motion observations of staff‐resident interactions. Results Residents' level of cognitive impairment had a significant impact on problem behaviors during ADL tasks, along with supervision required in patient care (P < 0.05). These results were validated by time‐motion analysis. Regression analysis revealed that for non‐demented subjects, the best indicator of care needs was health status, while for demented residents the best indicator was cognitive status (P < 0.0003). Conclusions The care needs of residents with dementia are better estimated by a mental status test for cognitive impairment then by ADL assessment alone. Greater agitation is associated with increasing cognitive impairment. Further, agitation and behavioral problems associated with care result in a need for increased staff supervision.

Journal

Journal of American Geriatrics SocietyWiley

Published: May 1, 1993

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off