Delineation of single‐word semantic comprehension deficits in aphasia, with anatomical correlation

Delineation of single‐word semantic comprehension deficits in aphasia, with anatomical correlation In 3 of 18 aphasic patients pure deficits in semantic comprehension at the single‐word level were defined through a series of tasks that excluded possible confounding deficits in auditory perception, visual perception, or speech production. In these pure cases, deficits were found at the superordinate, equivalence, and subordinate levels of single‐word semantic processing. Pure semantic deficits were found to be correlated with damage to the left posterior temporal and inferior parietal region; patients whose damage spared this area did not evince such deficits, and the converse was also true. This study confirms the existence of separable deficits in semantic comprehension and points conclusively to the left posterior temporal and inferior parietal region as being critical for semantic processing. This anatomical localization is in keeping with anatomical studies from nonhuman primates, suggesting that these regions may be concerned with multimodal processing and integration of language. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Neurology Wiley

Delineation of single‐word semantic comprehension deficits in aphasia, with anatomical correlation

Annals of Neurology, Volume 27 (3) – Mar 1, 1990

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 American Neurological Association
ISSN
0364-5134
eISSN
1531-8249
DOI
10.1002/ana.410270303
pmid
2327733
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 3 of 18 aphasic patients pure deficits in semantic comprehension at the single‐word level were defined through a series of tasks that excluded possible confounding deficits in auditory perception, visual perception, or speech production. In these pure cases, deficits were found at the superordinate, equivalence, and subordinate levels of single‐word semantic processing. Pure semantic deficits were found to be correlated with damage to the left posterior temporal and inferior parietal region; patients whose damage spared this area did not evince such deficits, and the converse was also true. This study confirms the existence of separable deficits in semantic comprehension and points conclusively to the left posterior temporal and inferior parietal region as being critical for semantic processing. This anatomical localization is in keeping with anatomical studies from nonhuman primates, suggesting that these regions may be concerned with multimodal processing and integration of language.

Journal

Annals of NeurologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1990

References

  • Semantic and phonemic aspects of auditory language comprehension in aphasia
    Gainotti, Gainotti; Caltagirone, Caltagirone; Ibba, Ibba
  • Computed tomographic scan correlates of auditory comprehension deficits in aphasia: a prospective recovery study
    Selnes, Selnes; Knopman, Knopman; Niccum, Niccum
  • Single‐unit activity in temporal association cortex of the monkey
    Gross, Gross; Schiller, Schiller; Wells, Wells

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