Delineating the association between mode of delivery and postpartum depression symptoms: a longitudinal study

Delineating the association between mode of delivery and postpartum depression symptoms: a... AbbreviationsBASIC projectBiology, Affect, Stress, Imaging and Cognition projectBMIbody mass indexCIconfidence intervalElCSelective cesarean sectionEmCSemergency cesarean sectionEPDSEdinburgh Postnatal Depression ScaleORodds ratioPPDpostpartum depressionVaDvaginal deliveryVEvacuum extractionKey MessageCesarean section does not seem to have a direct impact on postpartum depression. However, women delivering in an emergency setting via emergency cesarean section or vacuum extraction‐assisted delivery often report a negative delivery experience, which indirectly can lead to increased risk for postpartum depression.IntroductionDepression in mothers before and after childbirth is a major public health concern, with consequences on pregnancy outcome , mother affective status , and child behavioral and emotional development . The prevalence of postpartum depression (PPD) is estimated at around 10–20% and well‐established risk factors include presence of antepartum depression, psychiatric history, low self‐esteem, stressful life events and lack of social support .Mode of delivery has been investigated as a possible risk factor for PPD . Cesarean section itself, disappointment with mode of delivery, and a more prolonged recovery period may lead to increased stress, somatic complaints and low self‐esteem, predisposing to PPD. Studies on whether mode of delivery impacts on the risk of PPD show conflicting results; most of them have not found an independent association or report a devastating effect of cesarean http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica Wiley

Delineating the association between mode of delivery and postpartum depression symptoms: a longitudinal study

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
ISSN
0001-6349
eISSN
1600-0412
D.O.I.
10.1111/aogs.13275
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsBASIC projectBiology, Affect, Stress, Imaging and Cognition projectBMIbody mass indexCIconfidence intervalElCSelective cesarean sectionEmCSemergency cesarean sectionEPDSEdinburgh Postnatal Depression ScaleORodds ratioPPDpostpartum depressionVaDvaginal deliveryVEvacuum extractionKey MessageCesarean section does not seem to have a direct impact on postpartum depression. However, women delivering in an emergency setting via emergency cesarean section or vacuum extraction‐assisted delivery often report a negative delivery experience, which indirectly can lead to increased risk for postpartum depression.IntroductionDepression in mothers before and after childbirth is a major public health concern, with consequences on pregnancy outcome , mother affective status , and child behavioral and emotional development . The prevalence of postpartum depression (PPD) is estimated at around 10–20% and well‐established risk factors include presence of antepartum depression, psychiatric history, low self‐esteem, stressful life events and lack of social support .Mode of delivery has been investigated as a possible risk factor for PPD . Cesarean section itself, disappointment with mode of delivery, and a more prolonged recovery period may lead to increased stress, somatic complaints and low self‐esteem, predisposing to PPD. Studies on whether mode of delivery impacts on the risk of PPD show conflicting results; most of them have not found an independent association or report a devastating effect of cesarean

Journal

Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica ScandinavicaWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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