Deep Identity, Shallow Time: Sustaining a Future in Victorian Fishing Communities

Deep Identity, Shallow Time: Sustaining a Future in Victorian Fishing Communities Like commercial fishers everywhere, it seems, those living in coastal communities of Victoria perceive themselves to be under threat from recreational fishers, environmentalists, imposed management regimes, and modernisation and globalisation of the industry. In responding to these threats they appeal to conventional props of tradition—to continuity in genealogical time, affiliation with place and specialised knowledge and practice. This seems paradoxical, given that most established fishers in Victoria are first or second generation members of an industry that, through its 150‐year history, has been characterised by innovation and mobility. That paradox, we argue, is more apparent than real. Fisher identity is grounded primarily in engagement with an environment that is not familiar to outsiders. The paradox arises because fishers, like others who seek to sustain a future in the face of threat from outsiders, reshape strongly felt identity as tradition. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Australian Journal of Anthropology Wiley

Deep Identity, Shallow Time: Sustaining a Future in Victorian Fishing Communities

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1035-8811
eISSN
1757-6547
DOI
10.1111/j.1835-9310.2003.tb00220.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Like commercial fishers everywhere, it seems, those living in coastal communities of Victoria perceive themselves to be under threat from recreational fishers, environmentalists, imposed management regimes, and modernisation and globalisation of the industry. In responding to these threats they appeal to conventional props of tradition—to continuity in genealogical time, affiliation with place and specialised knowledge and practice. This seems paradoxical, given that most established fishers in Victoria are first or second generation members of an industry that, through its 150‐year history, has been characterised by innovation and mobility. That paradox, we argue, is more apparent than real. Fisher identity is grounded primarily in engagement with an environment that is not familiar to outsiders. The paradox arises because fishers, like others who seek to sustain a future in the face of threat from outsiders, reshape strongly felt identity as tradition.

Journal

The Australian Journal of AnthropologyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2003

References

  • Anthropology of fishing
    Acheson, J. M.
  • Black Bream in the Gippsland Lakes: In Crisis? Fact or Fallacy? An Angler's View
    Barr, L. G.
  • Fisheries Status Reports 1999
  • The Gaelic Vision of Scottish Culture
    Chapman, M.
  • The Mirror of the Sea
    Conrad, J.

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