D1 dopamine receptor stimulation enables the postsynaptic, but not autoreceptor, effects of D2 dopamine agonists in nigrostriatal and mesoaccumbens dopamine systems

D1 dopamine receptor stimulation enables the postsynaptic, but not autoreceptor, effects of D2... Possible functional interactions between D1 and D2 dopamine (DA) receptors were examined using extracellular single‐cell recording with microiontophoretic application of selective D1 and D2 receptor agonists both postsynaptically, in the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate‐putamen (CPu), and presynaptically, at impulse‐regulating somatodendritic DA autoreceptors in the ventral tegmental area (A10) and substantia nigra pars compacta (A9) In addition, synthesis‐modulating nerve terminal DA autoreceptors were studied in both the CPu and NAc using the gammabutyrolactone (GBL) neurochemical model of isolated nerve terminal autoreceptor function in vivo. In both the NAc and CPu, the inhibition of neurons produced by iontophoresis of the D2 receptor agonists quinpirole or RU‐24213 was attenuated by acute DA depletion via the tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor α‐methyl‐p‐tyrosine (AMPT). However, during iontophoresis of the selective D1 DA receptor agonist SKF 38393, the inhibitory effects of the D2 agonists were again evident, suggesting that the attenuation of D2 agonist‐induced inhibition was due to decreased D1 receptor activation. In contrast, the inhibitory effects produced by the non‐selective D1/D2 agonist apomorphine or by SKF 38393 were unaffected by AMPT pretreatment. Thus, D1 receptor activation appears necessary for D2 receptor‐mediated inhibition of NAc and CPu neurons, whereas D2 receptor activation is not required for the inhibition produced by D1 receptor stimulation. In contrast to postsynaptic D2 receptors, the ability of DA agonists to stimulate D2 DA autoreceptors was not altered by manipulations of D1 receptor occupation. Enhancing D1 receptor stimulation with SKF 38393 or reducing D1 receptor occupation with either the selective D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 or AMPT failed to alter the rate‐inhibitory effect of i.v. quinpirole on A9 or A10 DA neurons. Similarly, iontophoresis of SKF 38393 failed to alter the inhibitory effects of iontophoretic quinpirole. SKF 38393 also failed to affect the inhibition of GBL‐induced increases in DOPA accumulation (tyrosine hydroxylase activity) produced by quinpirole in either the NAc or CPu. Furthermore, reversal of GBL‐induced increases in DOPA accumulation by apomorphine or quinpirole was unaffected by pretreatment with SCH 23390. Therefore, D1 receptor occupation appears to be necessary for the expression of the functional effects of postsynaptic D2 receptor stimulation but not presynaptic D2 DA autoreceptor stimulation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Synapse Wiley

D1 dopamine receptor stimulation enables the postsynaptic, but not autoreceptor, effects of D2 dopamine agonists in nigrostriatal and mesoaccumbens dopamine systems

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 Alan R. Liss, Inc.
ISSN
0887-4476
eISSN
1098-2396
D.O.I.
10.1002/syn.890040409
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Possible functional interactions between D1 and D2 dopamine (DA) receptors were examined using extracellular single‐cell recording with microiontophoretic application of selective D1 and D2 receptor agonists both postsynaptically, in the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate‐putamen (CPu), and presynaptically, at impulse‐regulating somatodendritic DA autoreceptors in the ventral tegmental area (A10) and substantia nigra pars compacta (A9) In addition, synthesis‐modulating nerve terminal DA autoreceptors were studied in both the CPu and NAc using the gammabutyrolactone (GBL) neurochemical model of isolated nerve terminal autoreceptor function in vivo. In both the NAc and CPu, the inhibition of neurons produced by iontophoresis of the D2 receptor agonists quinpirole or RU‐24213 was attenuated by acute DA depletion via the tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor α‐methyl‐p‐tyrosine (AMPT). However, during iontophoresis of the selective D1 DA receptor agonist SKF 38393, the inhibitory effects of the D2 agonists were again evident, suggesting that the attenuation of D2 agonist‐induced inhibition was due to decreased D1 receptor activation. In contrast, the inhibitory effects produced by the non‐selective D1/D2 agonist apomorphine or by SKF 38393 were unaffected by AMPT pretreatment. Thus, D1 receptor activation appears necessary for D2 receptor‐mediated inhibition of NAc and CPu neurons, whereas D2 receptor activation is not required for the inhibition produced by D1 receptor stimulation. In contrast to postsynaptic D2 receptors, the ability of DA agonists to stimulate D2 DA autoreceptors was not altered by manipulations of D1 receptor occupation. Enhancing D1 receptor stimulation with SKF 38393 or reducing D1 receptor occupation with either the selective D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 or AMPT failed to alter the rate‐inhibitory effect of i.v. quinpirole on A9 or A10 DA neurons. Similarly, iontophoresis of SKF 38393 failed to alter the inhibitory effects of iontophoretic quinpirole. SKF 38393 also failed to affect the inhibition of GBL‐induced increases in DOPA accumulation (tyrosine hydroxylase activity) produced by quinpirole in either the NAc or CPu. Furthermore, reversal of GBL‐induced increases in DOPA accumulation by apomorphine or quinpirole was unaffected by pretreatment with SCH 23390. Therefore, D1 receptor occupation appears to be necessary for the expression of the functional effects of postsynaptic D2 receptor stimulation but not presynaptic D2 DA autoreceptor stimulation.

Journal

SynapseWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1989

References

  • Neurochemical studies of the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway: Somatodendritic mechanisms and GABAergic neurones in the rat ventral tegmentum
    Beart, Beart; McDonald, McDonald
  • Dopamine autoreceptors and the effects of drugs on locomotion and dopamine synthesis
    Brown, Brown; Campbell, Campbell; Mitchell, Mitchell; Randall, Randall
  • Neurophysiological investigation of effects of the D‐1 agonist SKF 38393 on tonic activity of substantia nigra dopamine neurons
    Carlson, Carlson; Bergstrom, Bergstrom; Weick, Weick; Walters, Walters
  • Bromocriptine induces marked locomotor stimulation in dopamine‐depleted mice when D‐1 dopamine receptors are stimulated with SKF38393
    Jackson, Jackson; Hashizume, Hashizume
  • Multiple receptors for dopamine
    Kebabian, Kebabian; Calne, Calne
  • Specific inhibition of dopamine D‐1 mediated cyclic AMP formation by dopamine D‐2, muscarinic cholinergic, and opiate receptor stimulation in striatal slices
    Kelly, Kelly; Nahorski, Nahorski
  • Unilateral lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway decreases the firing rate of globus pallidus neurons in the rat
    Pan, Pan; Walters, Walters
  • Effects of the putative D‐1 antagonist SCH 23390 on stereotyped behaviour induced by the D‐2 agonist RU24213
    Pugh, Pugh; O'Boyle, O'Boyle; Molloy, Molloy; Waddington, Waddington
  • Dopamine autoreceptors modulate the phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase in rat striatal slices
    Salah, Salah; Kuhn, Kuhn; Galloway, Galloway

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