Cytotoxic Triterpenoids from Roots of Actinidia chinensis

Cytotoxic Triterpenoids from Roots of Actinidia chinensis Phytochmical investigation of roots of Actinidia chinensisPlanch. led to the isolation triterpenoids 1 – 16, including a new compound 2α,3α,23,24‐tetrahydroxyursa‐12,20(30)‐dien‐28‐oic acid (1). Their structures were identified on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including 1D‐ and 2D‐NMR, HR‐ESI mass spectrometry, and by comparison with the literatures. The cytotoxicities of triterpenoids 1 – 16 against a panel of cultured human cancer cell lines (HepG2, A549, MCF‐7, SK‐OV‐3, and HeLa) were evaluated. The new compound 1 exhibited moderate antitumor activities with IC50 values of 19.62 ± 0.81, 18.86 ± 1.56, 45.94 ± 3.62, 62.41 ± 2.29, and 28.74 ± 1.07 μm, respectively. The experiment data might be available to explain the use of roots of A. chinensis to treat various cancers in traditional Chinese medicine. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Chemistry & Biodiversity Wiley

Cytotoxic Triterpenoids from Roots of Actinidia chinensis

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley‐VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland
ISSN
1612-1872
eISSN
1612-1880
D.O.I.
10.1002/cbdv.201700454
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Phytochmical investigation of roots of Actinidia chinensisPlanch. led to the isolation triterpenoids 1 – 16, including a new compound 2α,3α,23,24‐tetrahydroxyursa‐12,20(30)‐dien‐28‐oic acid (1). Their structures were identified on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including 1D‐ and 2D‐NMR, HR‐ESI mass spectrometry, and by comparison with the literatures. The cytotoxicities of triterpenoids 1 – 16 against a panel of cultured human cancer cell lines (HepG2, A549, MCF‐7, SK‐OV‐3, and HeLa) were evaluated. The new compound 1 exhibited moderate antitumor activities with IC50 values of 19.62 ± 0.81, 18.86 ± 1.56, 45.94 ± 3.62, 62.41 ± 2.29, and 28.74 ± 1.07 μm, respectively. The experiment data might be available to explain the use of roots of A. chinensis to treat various cancers in traditional Chinese medicine.

Journal

Chemistry & BiodiversityWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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