Cytometry and plant sciences: A personal retrospective

Cytometry and plant sciences: A personal retrospective The plant kingdom is divided into the lower plants (blue‐green algae, green algae, the bryophytes consisting of mosses and liverworts, and the euglenaphytes) and the higher plants (which mainly comprise the vascular plants). Higher plants are grouped into the pteridophytes (ferns) and their relatives, and the two classifications of seed plants, the angiosperms and the gymnosperms. The former comprises the monocotyledons and the dicotyledons, and the latter comprises the conifers and cycads ( 1 ). In this retrospective, I have restricted my coverage to the seed plants. Plants differ fundamentally from animals in a few general ways, one of which is the almost universal presence of a cellulosic cell wall. This is coupled to a method of cell division that involves partitioning of the daughter nuclei after mitosis by a phragmoplast, which expands and elaborates to join the parental cell walls, thereby effecting cytokinesis. Consequently, the cell walls of daughter cells remain topologically continuous with one another. Given that the entire mature form of a plant is achieved through regulated cell division and cell expansion, all cell walls can be viewed as a single continuum, termed the apoplast . The concept of flow cytometry and cell sorting arose http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cytometry Wiley

Cytometry and plant sciences: A personal retrospective

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Abstract

The plant kingdom is divided into the lower plants (blue‐green algae, green algae, the bryophytes consisting of mosses and liverworts, and the euglenaphytes) and the higher plants (which mainly comprise the vascular plants). Higher plants are grouped into the pteridophytes (ferns) and their relatives, and the two classifications of seed plants, the angiosperms and the gymnosperms. The former comprises the monocotyledons and the dicotyledons, and the latter comprises the conifers and cycads ( 1 ). In this retrospective, I have restricted my coverage to the seed plants. Plants differ fundamentally from animals in a few general ways, one of which is the almost universal presence of a cellulosic cell wall. This is coupled to a method of cell division that involves partitioning of the daughter nuclei after mitosis by a phragmoplast, which expands and elaborates to join the parental cell walls, thereby effecting cytokinesis. Consequently, the cell walls of daughter cells remain topologically continuous with one another. Given that the entire mature form of a plant is achieved through regulated cell division and cell expansion, all cell walls can be viewed as a single continuum, termed the apoplast . The concept of flow cytometry and cell sorting arose

Journal

CytometryWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2004

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