Cyanide‐Resistant Root Respiration and Tap Root Formation in Two Subspecies of Hypochaeris radicata

Cyanide‐Resistant Root Respiration and Tap Root Formation in Two Subspecies of Hypochaeris... Root respiration of the tap root forming species Hypochaeris radicata L. was measured during tap root formation. A comparison was made of two subspecies: H. radicata L. ssp. radicata L., a subspecies from relatively rich soils, and H. radicata L. ssp. ericetorum Van Soest, a subspecies from poor acidic soils. Root respiration was high and to a large extent inhibited by hydroxamic acid (SHAM) before the start of the tap root formation, indicating a high activity of an alternative non‐phosphorylative electron transport chain. The rate of root respiration was much lower and less sensitive to SHAM when a considerable tap root was present. However, root respiration was also cyanide‐resistant when a tap root was present, indicating that the alternative pathway was still present. A decreased rate of root respiration coincided with an increase of the content of storage carbohydrates, mainly in the tap root. The level of reducing sugars was constant throughout the experimental period, and it was concluded that the activity of the alternative oxidative pathway was significant in oxidation of sugars that could not be utilized for purposes like energy production, the formation of intermediates for growth or for storage. Root respiration decreased after the formation of a tap root. This decrease could neither be attributed to a gradual disappearance of the alternative chain, nor to a decreased level of reducing sugars. No differences in respiratory metabolism between the two subspecies have been observed, suggesting that a high activity of the alternative oxidative pathway is not significant in adaptation of the present two subspecies to relatively nutrient‐rich or poor soils. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physiologia Plantarum Wiley

Cyanide‐Resistant Root Respiration and Tap Root Formation in Two Subspecies of Hypochaeris radicata

Physiologia Plantarum, Volume 45 (2) – Feb 1, 1979

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/cyanide-resistant-root-respiration-and-tap-root-formation-in-two-W0Vn8M157u
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1979 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-9317
eISSN
1399-3054
DOI
10.1111/j.1399-3054.1979.tb01693.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Root respiration of the tap root forming species Hypochaeris radicata L. was measured during tap root formation. A comparison was made of two subspecies: H. radicata L. ssp. radicata L., a subspecies from relatively rich soils, and H. radicata L. ssp. ericetorum Van Soest, a subspecies from poor acidic soils. Root respiration was high and to a large extent inhibited by hydroxamic acid (SHAM) before the start of the tap root formation, indicating a high activity of an alternative non‐phosphorylative electron transport chain. The rate of root respiration was much lower and less sensitive to SHAM when a considerable tap root was present. However, root respiration was also cyanide‐resistant when a tap root was present, indicating that the alternative pathway was still present. A decreased rate of root respiration coincided with an increase of the content of storage carbohydrates, mainly in the tap root. The level of reducing sugars was constant throughout the experimental period, and it was concluded that the activity of the alternative oxidative pathway was significant in oxidation of sugars that could not be utilized for purposes like energy production, the formation of intermediates for growth or for storage. Root respiration decreased after the formation of a tap root. This decrease could neither be attributed to a gradual disappearance of the alternative chain, nor to a decreased level of reducing sugars. No differences in respiratory metabolism between the two subspecies have been observed, suggesting that a high activity of the alternative oxidative pathway is not significant in adaptation of the present two subspecies to relatively nutrient‐rich or poor soils.

Journal

Physiologia PlantarumWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1979

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off