Cutaneous eruptions by new therapies against hepatitis C virus infection. Not as common as we presumed

Cutaneous eruptions by new therapies against hepatitis C virus infection. Not as common as we... Antiviral treatment for patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has undergone a massive revolution in the last five years, since the development of HCV direct‐acting antiviral agents (DAAs). Several combinations of DAAs regimens have been reported to have a higher effectiveness and tolerability compared to IFN‐based regimens. The first available DAAs were the HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors, telaprevir and boceprevir. These newer HCV medications have been found to have a much greater response rate than the classic therapy. This has drawn the attention of specialist doctors, including dermatologists. In fact, in 2014, Klujszo et al. noticed the link between skin rashes and protease inhibitors during HCV therapy, which has been described in around 21% of patients using telaprevir. The high rate of adverse effects associated with this therapy was a common cause of withdrawal, limiting the possibility of achieving sustained virologic response in HCV‐infected patients. It has not been proven that newer protease inhibitors such as boceprevir increase the risk of skin rashes, as Carrascosa et al. explain in their article. There is a new combination of drugs, Ombitasvir/Paritaprevir/Ritonavir and Dasabuvir (Viekirax® and Exviera®) that is worth discussing, following our experience with a patient who had a generalized http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Dermatology Wiley

Cutaneous eruptions by new therapies against hepatitis C virus infection. Not as common as we presumed

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/cutaneous-eruptions-by-new-therapies-against-hepatitis-c-virus-EMSZD5yRIv
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
International Journal of Dermatology © 2018 International Society of Dermatology
ISSN
0011-9059
eISSN
1365-4632
D.O.I.
10.1111/ijd.13882
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Antiviral treatment for patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has undergone a massive revolution in the last five years, since the development of HCV direct‐acting antiviral agents (DAAs). Several combinations of DAAs regimens have been reported to have a higher effectiveness and tolerability compared to IFN‐based regimens. The first available DAAs were the HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors, telaprevir and boceprevir. These newer HCV medications have been found to have a much greater response rate than the classic therapy. This has drawn the attention of specialist doctors, including dermatologists. In fact, in 2014, Klujszo et al. noticed the link between skin rashes and protease inhibitors during HCV therapy, which has been described in around 21% of patients using telaprevir. The high rate of adverse effects associated with this therapy was a common cause of withdrawal, limiting the possibility of achieving sustained virologic response in HCV‐infected patients. It has not been proven that newer protease inhibitors such as boceprevir increase the risk of skin rashes, as Carrascosa et al. explain in their article. There is a new combination of drugs, Ombitasvir/Paritaprevir/Ritonavir and Dasabuvir (Viekirax® and Exviera®) that is worth discussing, following our experience with a patient who had a generalized

Journal

International Journal of DermatologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial