Crustal extension in the northern Apennines: The transition from compression to extension in the Alpi Apuane Core Complex

Crustal extension in the northern Apennines: The transition from compression to extension in the... An interpretation of Northern Apennine geology is presented which relates the temporal and spatial occurrence of both compressional and extensional deformation features in terms of the changing dynamic evolution within an accretionary wedge, after a model proposed by Platt (1986), followed by the initiation and development of continental rifting. During Cretaceous to Eocene time an accretionary wedge formed as remnant Tethyan oceanic crust subducted beneath the rotating Corsica‐Sardinia microplate. Microplate collision during the Oligocene was characterized by the rapid imbrication of buoyant continental crust of the Italian continental margin, the record of which is preserved within the duplex structure geometry of the Alpi Apuane region. The overthickened wedge geometry returned to a more stable configuration by developing extensional features during the Miocene: both listric normal faults at upper‐crustal levels and shear zones indicating evidence of distributed ductile extensional strain at mid‐crustal levels are recorded. It is proposed that large‐scale regional extension with associated volcanism beginning in the Messinian was represented by the intrusion of asthenospheric material from the subducted plate into the already attenuated accretionary complex. Further rifting, perhaps aided by subduction and back arc processes in the Southern Apennines, led to the formation of the Tyrrhenian Sea as an oceanic basin. Both the Apennines and North American core complexes record evidence of crustal thickening followed by crustal thinning, and finally of continental rifting. This suggests that the similar histories of these regions with vastly different plate tectonic settings may both be explained by processes linked to the changing internal dynamics of accretionary wedges. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tectonics Wiley

Crustal extension in the northern Apennines: The transition from compression to extension in the Alpi Apuane Core Complex

Tectonics, Volume 9 (6) – Dec 1, 1990

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/crustal-extension-in-the-northern-apennines-the-transition-from-SRb0r99jAc
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0278-7407
eISSN
1944-9194
DOI
10.1029/TC009i006p01275
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

An interpretation of Northern Apennine geology is presented which relates the temporal and spatial occurrence of both compressional and extensional deformation features in terms of the changing dynamic evolution within an accretionary wedge, after a model proposed by Platt (1986), followed by the initiation and development of continental rifting. During Cretaceous to Eocene time an accretionary wedge formed as remnant Tethyan oceanic crust subducted beneath the rotating Corsica‐Sardinia microplate. Microplate collision during the Oligocene was characterized by the rapid imbrication of buoyant continental crust of the Italian continental margin, the record of which is preserved within the duplex structure geometry of the Alpi Apuane region. The overthickened wedge geometry returned to a more stable configuration by developing extensional features during the Miocene: both listric normal faults at upper‐crustal levels and shear zones indicating evidence of distributed ductile extensional strain at mid‐crustal levels are recorded. It is proposed that large‐scale regional extension with associated volcanism beginning in the Messinian was represented by the intrusion of asthenospheric material from the subducted plate into the already attenuated accretionary complex. Further rifting, perhaps aided by subduction and back arc processes in the Southern Apennines, led to the formation of the Tyrrhenian Sea as an oceanic basin. Both the Apennines and North American core complexes record evidence of crustal thickening followed by crustal thinning, and finally of continental rifting. This suggests that the similar histories of these regions with vastly different plate tectonic settings may both be explained by processes linked to the changing internal dynamics of accretionary wedges.

Journal

TectonicsWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1990

References

  • Extension in the Tyrrhenian Sea and shortening in the Apennines as result of arc migration driven by sinking of the lithosphere
    Malinverno, Malinverno; Ryan, Ryan

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off